Learn more about the COMMANDS Trial, a phase 3 clinical research study for people with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with anemia
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Am I Eligible?

About the Phase 3 COMMANDS Trial

This clinical research study is looking for adults 18 years of age and older who have been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with anemia. The investigational study drug may help prevent the need for repeated blood transfusions.

The purpose of the study is to compare the effectiveness of a study drug versus a standard-of-care therapy. Individuals will be evaluated to determine their eligibility to participate. Each person who qualifies will receive either the study drug or standard-of-care therapy, study-related medical exams, and study-related laboratory tests at no cost.

About MDS and anemia

MDS is a rare blood cancer in which blood cells in the bone marrow do not grow to become healthy red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets – all the vital components of blood. Not being able to develop healthy red blood cells leads to anemia, which is common with MDS. Anemia has many of the same symptoms as MDS and causes even greater fatigue.

It can be exhausting to live with a condition that makes you feel like you’re being held back. If you’re caring for a loved one with the condition, it can be equally trying. However, right now, research is underway on an investigational study drug to see if it may help alleviate anemic symptoms and better manage your MDS. And you may be able to take part in this study.

More about COMMANDS trial participation

Participation in the study lasts approximately six years (and may be shorter or longer for certain patients). This includes:

• a screening period of approximately 35 days,
• an initial 24-week treatment period (which may be extended if certain criteria are met and if you continue to benefit from the treatment), and
• a follow-up period where you will be contacted approximately every 12 weeks to ask how you are doing. 

The study drug being used in the COMMANDS Trial is called luspatercept, which is a protein that aims to help increase the production of red blood cells in bone marrow. Luspatercept will be administered as an injection every three weeks during the treatment period.