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Ysterplaat, South Africa Clinical Trials

A listing of Ysterplaat, South Africa clinical trials actively recruiting patients volunteers.

RESULTS

Found (8) clinical trials

A Phase 1/2 Trial of Multiple Oral Doses of OPC-167832 for Uncomplicated Pulmonary Tuberculosis

This trial will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of multiple oral doses of OPC-167832 in subjects with uncomplicated, smear-positive, drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis (TB).

Phase

4.18 miles

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Transfer of Healthy Gut Flora for Restoration of Intestinal Microbiota Via Enema for Severe Acute Malnutrition

This single-center, randomized, open-label trial will compare the safety and efficacy of MTT delivered by rectal catheter enema in participants 12-60 months of age with stable SAM not responsive to at least 8 weeks of standard therapy. Participants must meet inclusion criteria, no exclusion criteria prior to randomization. Participants will ...

Phase

4.26 miles

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Safety of and Immune Response to Dolutegravir in HIV-1 Infected Infants Children and Adolescents

DTG is an HIV medicine in the integrase inhibitor drug class. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety, tolerability, and antiviral activity of DTG in HIV-1 infected infants, children, and adolescents. Participation in this study will last approximately 48 weeks, followed by long-term safety follow-up that ...

Phase

6.73 miles

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Very Early Intensive Treatment of HIV-Infected Infants to Achieve HIV Remission

The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of early intensive antiretroviral therapy (ART) on achieving HIV remission (HIV RNA below the limit of detection of the assay) among HIV-infected infants. The study will enroll two cohorts. Cohort 1 will include infants at high risk for in utero ...

Phase

6.73 miles

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Evaluating the Safety and Antiviral Activity of Monoclonal Antibody VRC01 in HIV-Infected Infants Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

VRC01 is an experimental human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and antiviral activity of VRC01 in HIV-1-infected infants initiating cART within 12 weeks of birth. The infants will be randomly assigned to either receive VRC01 (Arm 1) or not receive ...

Phase

6.73 miles

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Evaluating the Pharmacokinetics Safety and Tolerability of Bedaquiline in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Infants Children and Adolescents With Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

This purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of bedaquiline (BDQ) in combination with an optimized background multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment regimen in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected infants, children, and adolescents. The study will enroll HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children 0 to 18 years of age ...

Phase

7.55 miles

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Safety Tolerability and Pharmacokinetics of MK-1654 in Infants (MK-1654-002)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and incidence of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) of single ascending doses of MK-1654 in healthy pre-term (born at 29 to 35 weeks gestational age) and full-term (born at >35 weeks gestational age) infants. Key safety and tolerability variables will ...

Phase

7.55 miles

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Evaluating the Pharmacokinetics Safety and Tolerability of Delamanid in Combination With Optimized Multidrug Background Regimen (OBR) for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Children With MDR-TB

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of the anti-TB drug DLM in combination with OBR for MDR-TB in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children with MDR-TB. Participants will be enrolled in one of four age cohorts: 12 to less than 18 years, 6 to less ...

Phase

7.55 miles

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