Longitudinal Study of Genetic Causes of Intrahepatic Cholestasis (LOGIC) (LOGIC)

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • End date
    May 2, 2024
  • participants needed
    1675
  • sponsor
    Arbor Research Collaborative for Health
Updated on 2 May 2022
deficiency
liver disease
bile acid
small intestine
cholestasis
alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (human)
bile salts

Summary

Cholestasis is a condition in which bile is not properly transported from the liver to the small intestine. Cholestasis can be caused by an array of childhood diseases, including the genetic diseases Alagille syndrome (ALGS), alpha-1 antitrypsin (a-1AT) deficiency, bile acid synthesis and metabolism defects, and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) or benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis(BRIC). This study will investigate the natural history and progression of the four previously mentioned cholestatic liver diseases to provide a better understanding of the causes and effects of the diseases.

Description

Cholestasis is a rare condition that involves a reduction or obstruction of bile flow from the liver to the small intestine. When bile flow is hindered, a waste product pigment called bilirubin can escape into the bloodstream and build up to harmful levels. This may lead to the easily recognizable cholestatic symptoms of jaundice, itching, and impaired growth and eventually to more serious health problems. Four rare genetic liver disorders- ALGS, a-1AT, bile acid synthesis and metabolism defects, and PFIC-account for about 20% to 30% of all infant cases of cholestasis. These four disorders compose a group of related diseases that can cause significant growth problems during childhood, serious liver problems, the need for liver transplantation, and potentially death. More research on these rare liver diseases is necessary to develop a scientific basis for improvement in diagnostic techniques and treatments. Current diagnostic procedures are complex, and the development of simpler diagnostic tests would facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. This study will investigate the natural history and progression of the four previously mentioned cholestatic liver diseases to provide a better understanding of the causes and effects of the diseases.

Participation in this study will last 20 years and will consist of a baseline visit and 20 annual follow-up visits. The study will enroll infants through adults 25 years of age who have, or are suspected of having, one of the four genetic cholestatic liver diseases. Individuals who are siblings of a-A1T participants and have underlying disease with no evidence of liver involvement may also be enrolled. Study visits will involve review of clinical information, family history, and any clinically indicated treatments and their outcomes; a physical exam; laboratory tests; and radiologic and imaging evaluations. In addition to these standard of care evaluations, participants will undergo several special research evaluations, including quality of life questionnaires, neurodevelopmental evaluations, hearing exams, liver histology studies, and collection of serum, plasma, urine, and blood for DNA. Serum, plasma, and blood for DNA will also be collected from both biological parents and from affected siblings of participants with a-A1T or ALGS. Genetic testing will be performed using the collected specimens.

Details
Condition Liver Diseases, Alagille Syndrome, Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT00571272
SponsorArbor Research Collaborative for Health
Last Modified on2 May 2022

Eligibility

Yes No Not Sure

Inclusion Criteria

Children and young adults diagnosed with one of the four cholestatic diseases from birth through 25 years old
Siblings of participants with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, who themselves have alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency of liver disease
Both genders, all races and ethnic groups
Participant meets the enrollment criteria for one of the four cholestatic liver diseases

Exclusion Criteria

Inability to comply with the longitudinal follow-up described below, or
Failure of a family/patient to sign the informed consent document or the HIPAA medical record release form
Clear my responses

How to participate?

Step 1 Connect with a study center
What happens next?
  • You can expect the study team to contact you via email or phone in the next few days.
  • Sign up as volunteer  to help accelerate the development of new treatments and to get notified about similar trials.

You are contacting

Investigator Avatar

Primary Contact

site

Additional screening procedures may be conducted by the study team before you can be confirmed eligible to participate.

Learn more

If you are confirmed eligible after full screening, you will be required to understand and sign the informed consent if you decide to enroll in the study. Once enrolled you may be asked to make scheduled visits over a period of time.

Learn more

Complete your scheduled study participation activities and then you are done. You may receive summary of study results if provided by the sponsor.

Learn more

Similar trials to consider

Loading...

Browse trials for

Not finding what you're looking for?

Every year hundreds of thousands of volunteers step forward to participate in research. Sign up as a volunteer and receive email notifications when clinical trials are posted in the medical category of interest to you.

Sign up as volunteer

user name

Added by • 

 • 

Private

Reply by • Private
Loading...

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur, adipisicing elit. Ipsa vel nobis alias. Quae eveniet velit voluptate quo doloribus maxime et dicta in sequi, corporis quod. Ea, dolor eius? Dolore, vel!

  The passcode will expire in None.
Loading...

No annotations made yet

Add a private note
  • abc Select a piece of text from the left.
  • Add notes visible only to you.
  • Send it to people through a passcode protected link.
Add a private note