Long-Term Respiratory Muscle Strength in Young COVID-19 Patients

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • participants needed
    108
  • sponsor
    Karabuk University
Updated on 3 October 2022
Accepts healthy volunteers

Summary

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly contagious disorder caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). COVID-19 is a multisystem disease and therefore presents a variety of symptoms in the acute phase, such as fever, dry cough, fatigue, sore throat, loss of taste or smell, shortness of breath, nasal congestion, chest pain, muscle or joint pain, headache, and nausea.

COVID-19 primarily affects the respiratory functions of individuals. Although this situation is more difficult in hospitalized patients, it also causes severe effects in individuals who recover with home medication. It is thought that this damage caused by COVID-19 may cause permanent effects on individuals in the long term. During the COVID-19 period, individuals also had to maintain an inactive lifestyle due to quarantine. This decrease in physical activity capacity also causes permanent damage to the respiratory functions of individuals. In addition, studies have focused on this population, as COVID-19 usually affects older individuals. However, considering that young people are also exposed to the COVID-19 virus, the effect on respiratory functions in these individuals should also be examined. Combined with the available information on pulmonary functions, there is insufficient evidence about extrapulmonary features in post-COVID-19 patients who survive mild illness in the long term. It is also necessary to examine whether there is permanent damage to extrapulmonary features such as peripheral muscle strength in these individuals.

Therefore, in our study, it is aimed to examine the long-term results of respiratory functions, respiratory muscle strength and peripheral muscle strength of young individuals who recovered from COVID-19 and recovered from mild disease.

Details
Condition COVID-19
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT05381714
SponsorKarabuk University
Last Modified on3 October 2022

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