Ultrasonographic Assessment of Painful and Stiff Hemiplegic Shoulder in Terms of Adhesive Capsulitis

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • End date
    Oct 6, 2023
  • participants needed
    60
  • sponsor
    Izmir Katip Celebi University
Updated on 16 December 2021
shoulder pain
capsulitis
Accepts healthy volunteers

Summary

Although a relationship has been reported between stroke and adhesive capsulitis, it is controversial whether the underlying cause of the capsular changes seen in hemiplegic shoulder pain is true adhesive capsulitis. Although there has been a limited number of studies, ultrasound, which has been reported as a sensitive and specific method in the diagnosis of true (idiopathic) adhesive capsulitis, has not yielded similar results to arthrography and MRI in demonstrating fibrotic and adhesive changes in the glenohumeral capsule in stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain. This study aims to investigate ultrasonographic structural changes that may be associated with adhesive capsulitis in subacute stroke patients with painful and stiff hemiplegic side shoulder.

Description

Hemiplegic shoulder pain is one of the commonly seen complications of a stroke. Limitation of shoulder joint movement is added to hemiplegic shoulder pain in time. Therefore, adhesive capsulitis is one of the differential diagnoses that come to mind first in patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain and stiffness. Indeed, in arthrographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, it has been reported that adhesive capsulitis (or more accurately, capsular changes), is quite frequent.

Although a relationship has been reported between stroke and adhesive capsulitis, it is controversial whether the underlying cause of the capsular changes seen in hemiplegic shoulder pain is true adhesive capsulitis. Although these capsular changes and joint limitations in patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain may theoretically be related to idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, secondary causes including spasticity, contracture, fibrosis due to lack of movement, rotator cuff lesions, and glenohumeral subluxation have also been emphasized as a cause of the capsular restriction. Although there have been a limited number of studies, ultrasound, which has been reported as a sensitive and specific method in the diagnosis of true (idiopathic) adhesive capsulitis, has not yielded similar results to arthrography and MRI in demonstrating fibrotic and adhesive changes in the glenohumeral capsule in stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain and stiffness. Because ultrasonographic examinations are mostly focused on rotator cuff tendons, bicipital tendon, and subacromial bursa, lack of detailed examination in terms of adhesive capsulitis may be one of the underlying reasons for this inconsistency. In this context, this study aims to investigate ultrasonographic structural changes that may be associated with adhesive capsulitis in subacute stroke patients with painful and stiff hemiplegic side shoulder.

Details
Condition Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder, Hemiplegia
Treatment Imaging
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT04613648
SponsorIzmir Katip Celebi University
Last Modified on16 December 2021

Eligibility

Yes No Not Sure

Inclusion Criteria

First stroke
Stroke duration from 1 month to 6 months
To be able to communicate well
Presence of hemiplegic side shoulder pain
Limitation of passive glenohumeral joint abduction on the hemiplegic side
Limitation of passive glenohumeral joint external rotation of the hemiplegic side

Exclusion Criteria

Stroke duration <1 month or > 6 months
Only presence of one of the pain or stiffness in the hemiplegic side shoulder
History of pre-stroke shoulder pain independent from the side of shoulder
Pain and / or stiffness in the non-hemiplegic side shoulder
History of shoulder injury (independent from the side)
History of upper extremity surgery (independent from the side)
Weakness in both upper extremities
Existence of non-stroke diseases (osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, etc.) that may cause restriction in the shoulder joint
Inability to communicate properly
<40 years old
Hand pain and/or swelling in addition to shoulder pain and stiffness
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