Contribution of Dolutegravir to Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • participants needed
    30
  • sponsor
    Augusta University
Updated on 28 May 2022

Summary

The goal of the study is to combine a collaborative and translational approach to evaluate the effect antiretroviral regimen switch to a dolutegravir containing regimen compared to continued treatment with a non- dolutegravir based regimen on on lipid and metabolic profiles, renal function, body composition, vascular function and diet.

Description

Over the last decades, the use of combined antiretroviral therapy has led to profound suppression of HIV-1 replication and increased the survival of persons living with HIV (PLWH) to close to that of the general population. As a consequence, the spectrum of diseases related to HIV has shifted from opportunistic AIDS-related diseases towards long-term-age-related complications. Individuals living with HIV are now exhibiting accelerated development of obesity, metabolic derangements and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent compelling clinical evidence has documented a drastic shift in anthropometric profiles among persons living with HIV. In addition, several reports present dolutegravir, a second-generation integrase inhibitor currently highly prescribed for its high antiviral efficiency, as the potential cause of unpredicted weight gain. A critical gap in the investigators' knowledge is a lack of understanding of the etiopathology of the contribution of dolutegravir on weight gain and the consequential impact on obesity and cardiovascular disease in persons living with HIV on combined antiretroviral therapy. As overweight and obesity are among the leading risk factors for cardiovascular disease in persons living with HIV, it is critical to directly investigate whether dolutegravir increases fat mass in persons living with HIV and whether body weight gains-associated with dolutegravir based regimen contribute to the increased prevalence of CVD in this population of people.

This application seeks to investigate alterations in body fat and cardiometabolic risk markers associated with dolutegravir. The investigators propose that in patients with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, there is a direct correlation of weight gain and dolutegravir after antiretroviral regimen switch. They also contend that dolutegravir associated weight gain induces a phenotypic metabolic shift which alters the vascular endothelium and potentiates CVD risk. If the investigators are correct in their hypotheses, modifications in the clinical practice of treatment and prevention strategies for CVD in people living with HIV may be warranted.

Herein the investigators propose a novel translational study which will concomitantly investigate in human patients and animal models of HIV:

  1. whether dolutegravir based regimen increases body weight
  2. the mechanisms whereby dolutegravir increases body weight
  3. whether dolutegravir-mediated body weight gain increases the risk for CVD in PLWH.

Details
Condition Vascular Diseases, Vascular Diseases, HIV-Associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Abnormalities, Cardiovascular Abnormalities, Weight change, CONGENITAL ANOMALY NOS, Growth Hormone Deficiencies/Abnormalities, Female Hormonal Deficiencies/Abnormalities, Male Hormonal Deficiencies/Abnormalities, Birth Defects, Growth Hormone Deficiencies/Abnormalities, Female Hormonal Deficiencies/Abnormalities, Male Hormonal Deficiencies/Abnormalities, Body Fat Disorder, Antiviral Drug Adverse Reaction, Birth Defects, vascular disorder, vascular disease, vasculopathy, vasc, HIV-1-infection, Abnormality of Adipose Tissue, HIV-1-infection
Treatment Dolutegravir 50 mg, Antiretroviral/Anti HIV
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT04340388
SponsorAugusta University
Last Modified on28 May 2022

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