Evaluation of the Impact of Lesions of the Motor and Proprioceptive Brain and Pan-medullary Pathways on Their Clinically and Electrophysiologically Assessed Function in Multiple Sclerosis (MS-TRACTS)

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • End date
    Dec 31, 2024
  • participants needed
    90
  • sponsor
    Rennes University Hospital
Updated on 26 May 2022
Accepts healthy volunteers

Summary

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common acquired neurological disease leading to disability, especially ambulatory, in young adults. To date, the correlation between the number or volume of white matter lesions seen on conventional MRI and the degree of disability of patients remains low to moderate. This phenomenon is known as the "clinical-radiological paradox".

In this new project, we hypothesize that an evaluation of the corticospinal pathways including their thoracic medullary portion, as well as taking into account the severity of the lesions using quantitative MRI, will allow the investigators to refine the correlation with ambulatory disability in MS patients. We will complete the evaluation of motor pathways with those of the proprioceptive pathways also strongly involved in ambulation.

Description

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common acquired neurological disease leading to disability, especially ambulatory, in young adults. To date, the correlation between the number or volume of white matter lesions seen on conventional MRI and the degree of disability of patients remains low to moderate. This phenomenon is known as the "clinical-radiological paradox".

The impact of the precise localisation of focal MS lesions on certain circuits particularly involved in ambulation, such as pyramidal or proprioceptive beams, has however been little studied in imaging, mainly due to technical limitations. Indeed, such studies require the acquisition of brain and spinal cord MRI images of sufficient spatial resolution to allow the localisation of focal lesions and pathways. Several previous studies have shown encouraging results by separately studying damage to the brain or spinal cord portion of the corticospinal bundle and relating it to disability. To our knowledge, no studies have analysed the lesional involvement of the cortico-spinal bundle or the entire proprioceptive bundle from the motor cortex to the medullary cone in patients with MS.

In a preliminary study, we studied the cerebral spinal cortex and cervical spinal cord bundle using data from the PHRC 2012 EMISEP and obtained encouraging results. In particular, we have shown that the cortico-spinal pathways are very frequently affected by focal lesions in the early years of the disease and that it is already correlated with the functional consequences in patients measured clinically and in electrophysiology.

In this new project, we hypothesize that an evaluation of the corticospinal pathways including their thoracic medullary portion, as well as taking into account the severity of the lesions using quantitative MRI, will allow the investigators to refine the correlation with ambulatory disability in MS patients. We will complete the evaluation of motor pathways with those of the proprioceptive pathways also strongly involved in ambulation.

Details
Condition Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting
Treatment MRI, Electrophysiology
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT04220814
SponsorRennes University Hospital
Last Modified on26 May 2022

Eligibility

Yes No Not Sure

Inclusion Criteria

Patients
More than 18 years old
relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis according to Mac Donald criteria (2010)
EDSS score at the inclusion from 0 to 4
With at least 1 symptom of pyramidal injury during clinical exam
Written informed consent
Affiliated to a Health Care system
Healthy Volunteers
More than 18 years old
Written informed consent
Affiliated to a Health Care system

Exclusion Criteria

Patients
progressive MS
Corticoids during the last 60 days before inclusion
Other neurological disease or Other progressive systemic disease
adults subject to legal protection or persons deprived of liberty
Contraindications to MRI
Contraindications to motor evoked potentials
Current pregnancy or breast-feeding
Healthy volunteers
History of disease affecting central nervous system
Familial history of MS
History of medullar injury
Spinal osteoarthritis which can lead to a spinal hypersignal
adults subject to legal protection or persons deprived of liberty
Contraindications to MRI
Contraindications to motor evoked potentials
Current pregnancy or breast-feeding
Clear my responses

How to participate?

Step 1 Connect with a study center
What happens next?
  • You can expect the study team to contact you via email or phone in the next few days.
  • Sign up as volunteer to help accelerate the development of new treatments and to get notified about similar trials.

You are contacting

Investigator Avatar

Primary Contact

site

0/250

Additional screening procedures may be conducted by the study team before you can be confirmed eligible to participate.

Learn more

If you are confirmed eligible after full screening, you will be required to understand and sign the informed consent if you decide to enroll in the study. Once enrolled you may be asked to make scheduled visits over a period of time.

Learn more

Complete your scheduled study participation activities and then you are done. You may receive summary of study results if provided by the sponsor.

Learn more

Similar trials to consider

Loading...

Browse trials for

Not finding what you're looking for?

Every year hundreds of thousands of volunteers step forward to participate in research. Sign up as a volunteer and receive email notifications when clinical trials are posted in the medical category of interest to you.

Sign up as volunteer

user name

Added by • 

 • 

Private

Reply by • Private
Loading...

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur, adipisicing elit. Ipsa vel nobis alias. Quae eveniet velit voluptate quo doloribus maxime et dicta in sequi, corporis quod. Ea, dolor eius? Dolore, vel!

  The passcode will expire in None.
Loading...

No annotations made yet

Add a private note
  • abc Select a piece of text from the left.
  • Add notes visible only to you.
  • Send it to people through a passcode protected link.
Add a private note