The Covid-19 HEalth caRe wOrkErS (HEROES) Study

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • End date
    Dec 31, 2021
  • participants needed
    2000
  • sponsor
    University of Chile
Updated on 11 April 2021
anxiety
covid-19
SARS
coronavirus
coronavirus infection

Summary

Since December 2019 the world has been shaken with an enormous global threat: the Covid-19 pandemic. This new kind of coronavirus is generating an unprecedented impact both on the general population and on the healthcare systems in most countries. Health services are trying to expand their capacity to respond to the pandemic, taking actions such as increasing the number of beds; acquiring necessary equipment to provide intensive therapy (ventilators), and calling retired health professionals and health students so they can assist the overwhelmed health care workforce. Unfortunately, these organizational changes at health facilities, along with the fears and concerns of becoming ill with the virus or infecting their families, put an enormous emotional burden on workers in health services which may lead to negative outcomes on mental health in this population.

Recent cross-sectional studies in China indicate that health service workers exposed to people with Covid-19 reported higher rates of depressive and anxious symptoms. This negative impact on mental health among health workers in China has also been informally reported in other countries where the Covid-19 pandemic has been devastating in its effects (such as Spain and Italy), as well as in countries where the pandemic is becoming a growing public health problem. This is particularly relevant in regions with fewer resources (Latin America, North Africa), where there are limited means and the response from the health system is usually insufficient. Moreover, it is necessary to study these negative effects longitudinally considering that some effects will appear over time (post-traumatic stress).

The COVID-19 HEalth caRe wOrkErS (HEROES) study is a large, bottom-up, South-North initiative aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of health care workers (HCWs). HEROES encompasses a wide variety of academic institutions in 19 LMICs and 8 HICs, in partnership with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and with support from the World Health Organization (WHO). The HEROES study is led by Dr. Rubn Alvarado at University of Chile, and Dr. Ezra Susser and Franco Mascayano at Columbia U Mailman School of Public Health.

Description

Since December 2019 the world has been shaken with an enormous global threat: the Covid-19 pandemic. This new kind of coronavirus is generating an unprecedented impact both on the general population and on the healthcare systems in most countries. Health services are trying to expand their capacity to respond to the pandemic, taking actions such as increasing the number of beds; acquiring necessary equipment to provide intensive therapy (ventilators), and calling retired health professionals and health students so they can assist the overwhelmed health care workforce. Unfortunately, these organizational changes at health facilities, along with the fears and concerns of becoming ill with the virus or infecting their families, put an enormous emotional burden on workers in health services which may lead to negative outcomes on mental health in this population. Based on the literature to date, Covid-19 is significantly larger than previous pandemics in terms of the number of affected people worldwide, its spread across countries, its impact on healthcare systems and the severity of measures that have been taken by governments. Immediate consequences are palpable in the health care system. Many healthcare workers are overwhelmed by the increased workload; the lack of supplies and materials to provide appropriate treatment; the lack of clinical guidelines on prioritization and triage; and the increased feelings of isolation and loneliness. Previous research indicates that these negative effects can last over time and lead to the development of serious mental health problems such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

Recent cross-sectional studies in China indicate that health service workers exposed to people with Covid-19 reported higher rates of depressive and anxious symptoms. This negative impact on mental health among health workers in China has also been informally reported in other countries where the Covid-19 pandemic has been devastating in its effects (such as Spain and Italy), as well as in countries where the pandemic is becoming a growing public health problem. This is particularly relevant in regions with fewer resources (Latin America, North Africa), where there are limited means and the response from the health system is usually insufficient. Moreover, it is necessary to study these negative effects longitudinally considering that some effects will appear over time (post-traumatic stress). Also, it is necessary to take into account the nature and the extent of the health response (e.g., deployment, increased workload) in order to advance our understanding of these complex phenomenon and to inform policy and develop the kind of supports that this population deems useful.

The COVID-19 HEalth caRe wOrkErS (HEROES) study is a large, bottom-up, South-North initiative aimed to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of health care workers (HCWs). HEROES encompasses a wide variety of academic institutions in 19 LMICs and 8 HICs, in partnership with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and with support from the World Health Organization (WHO). The HEROES study is led by Dr. Rubn Alvarado at University of Chile, and Dr. Ezra Susser and Franco Mascayano at Columbia U Mailman School of Public Health.

Participants will complete an online questionnaire, which will be completely self-administered. It will take approximately 12 minutes and includes sociodemographic data, questions on work activity, training, fears and concerns related to Covid-19, as well as the GHQ-12 and a series of questions on other mental health issues (e.g., suicide, acute stress), resilience and psycho/social factors (e.g., formal and informal support).

Details
Condition Mental illness, Endogenous depression, Depression, Stress Disorders, Traumatic, ANXIETY NEUROSIS, Anxiety, Depression (Major/Severe), Anxiety Disorders (Pediatric), Depression (Adolescent), Depression (Pediatric), Depression (Adult and Geriatric), Depression (Treatment-Resistant), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Depressed, Psychological Disorders, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD - Pediatric), Anxiety Symptoms, Anxiety Disorders, *COVID-19, Covid-19, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2, depressive disorder, psychiatric disorder, psychiatric illness, mental disorder, psychiatric disorders, mental disorders, psychological disorder, psychiatric diseases, psychiatric disease, mental disease, traumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorder, depressed mood, miserable, depressive disorders, anxious, Sars Cov 2
Treatment Exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 and its consequences
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT04352634
SponsorUniversity of Chile
Last Modified on11 April 2021

Eligibility

Yes No Not Sure

Inclusion Criteria

Legal age
Currently working on a health service that provides care to COVID-19 patients
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Exclusion Criteria

Inability to use electronic devices (required to complete the survey)
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If you are confirmed eligible after full screening, you will be required to understand and sign the informed consent if you decide to enroll in the study. Once enrolled you may be asked to make scheduled visits over a period of time.

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