Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Treating Patients With Prostate Cancer

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • participants needed
    2000
  • sponsor
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia
Updated on 7 November 2020
Investigator
George Hruby, MD
Primary Contact
Sydney Cancer Centre at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (7.5 mi away) Contact
+8 other location
androgens
epinephrine
antiandrogen therapy
androgen suppression
antiandrogens
orchiectomy

Summary

RATIONALE: Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen deprivation therapy may stop the adrenal glands from making androgens. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying how well androgen deprivation therapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer.

Description

OBJECTIVES: Primary - Compare overall survival (with acceptable morbidity) of patients with prostate cancer treated with delayed vs immediate androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Secondary - Compare cancer-specific survival of patients treated with these regimens. - Compare clinical progression in patients treated with these regimens. - Compare time to first androgen independence in patients treated with these regimens. - Compare complication rate incidence and timing (e.g., cord compression or pathological failure) in patients treated with these regimens. - Compare treatment-related morbidity (including cognitive morbidity or osteoporosis) in patients treated with these regimens. - Compare quality of life of patients treated with these regimens. - Determine prognostic factors for progression in patients treated with delayed ADT. OUTLINE: This is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study. Patients in group 1 are stratified according to prior therapy (prostatectomy vs radiotherapy vs prostatectomy and radiotherapy), relapse-free interval (< 2 years vs ≥ 2 years), type of planned androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) (continuous vs intermittent), and participating center. Patients in group 2 are stratified according to type of planned ADT (continuous vs intermittent), disease type (localized vs metastatic), and participating center. Patients in both groups are randomized to 1 of 2 treatment arms. - Arm I (delayed ADT): Beginning at least 2 years after study entry or after exhibiting evidence of significant disease progression*, patients receive either continuous ADT OR intermittent ADT comprising either bilateral orchiectomy OR luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist with or without oral antiandrogen therapy. - Arm II (immediate ADT): Beginning immediately after randomization, patients receive either continuous ADT OR intermittent ADT as in arm I. NOTE: *Patients in group 1 begin delayed ADT at least 2 years after study entry unless 1 of the following clinical criteria is present: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time of < 12 months with PSA ≥ 10 ng/mL OR PSA doubling time of ≤ 6 months based on 3 consecutive measurements obtained ≥ 2 months apart OR development of metastases or symptoms. Patients in group 2 begin delayed ADT at least 2 years after study entry unless 1 of the following clinical criteria is present: development of symptoms OR PSA ≥ 60 ng/mL OR PSA doubling time of ≤ 6 months based on 3 consecutive measurements obtained ≥ 2 months apart. After 9 months of ADT, all patients are assessed for response. Patients with PSA < 4 ng/mL may discontinue ADT. These patients are followed every 3 months. Treatment may be restarted when PSA is > 20 ng/mL OR PSA is > the PSA level at study entry OR at clinical progression. Quality of life is assessed at baseline, every 6 months for 2 years, and then annually for 3 years. Patients are followed every 3 months for 2 years, every 6 months for 3 years, and then periodically thereafter at the discretion of the principal investigator. PROJECTED ACCRUAL: A total of 300-2,000 patients will be accrued for this study within 2-5 years.

Details
Treatment antiandrogen therapy, releasing hormone agonist therapy, orchiectomy
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT00110162
SponsorPeter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia
Last Modified on7 November 2020

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