Last updated on July 2019

Defining the Optimal Duration of Treatment for "Low-Risk" Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis


Brief description of study

Background According to the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) recommendations, "low-risk" peritoneal dialysis (PD)- related peritonitis caused by coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, Streptococcal species, or negative bacterial culture should receive antibiotics for 2 weeks. However, relapsing, recurrent, or repeated episodes are common.

Objectives To compare the incidence of relapsing, recurrent, and repeat peritonitis with a 3-week course, as compared to the conventional 2-week course, antibiotic for PD-related peritonitis. Hypothesis Treatment of low-risk PD-related peritonitis for 3 weeks reduces the incidence of relapsing, recurrent, and repeat peritonitis. Design and subjects Randomized control trial of 310 episodes of "low-risk" PD-related peritonitis.

Study instruments and interventions Patients will be randomized to receive treatment of the effective antibiotic according to the ISPD recommendations for 2 weeks (Conventional Group) or 3 weeks (Extended Group). All patients will be followed for 6 months after completion of treatment. Main outcome measures Complete cure of the peritonitis episode, defined as survival for 6 months without relapsing, recurrent, or repeat peritonitis episodes. Data analysis Data will be analyzed by both intention-to-treat and per protocol approach. The incidences of complete cure, relapsing, recurrent, and repeated peritonitis episodes will be compared. Expected results Based on our pilot study, we expect to find a significantly lower rate of relapsing, recurrent, and repeated peritonitis episodes in the Extended Group. By proving that "low-risk" peritonitis episodes require 3-week course of antibiotic therapy, our result will change the current recommendation and make treatment for 3 weeks course the standard of care.

Detailed Study Description

Background According to the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) recommendations, "low-risk" peritoneal dialysis (PD)- related peritonitis caused by coagulase-negative staphylococcal species, Streptococcal species, or negative bacterial culture should receive antibiotics for 2 weeks. However, relapsing, recurrent, or repeated episodes are common.

Objectives To compare the incidence of relapsing, recurrent, and repeat peritonitis with a 3-week course, as compared to the conventional 2-week course, antibiotic for PD-related peritonitis. Hypothesis Treatment of low-risk PD-related peritonitis for 3 weeks reduces the incidence of relapsing, recurrent, and repeat peritonitis. Design and subjects Randomized control trial of 310 episodes of "low-risk" PD-related peritonitis.

Study instruments and interventions Patients will be randomized to receive treatment of the effective antibiotic according to the ISPD recommendations for 2 weeks (Conventional Group) or 3 weeks (Extended Group). All patients will be followed for 6 months after completion of treatment. Main outcome measures Complete cure of the peritonitis episode, defined as survival for 6 months without relapsing, recurrent, or repeat peritonitis episodes. Data analysis Data will be analyzed by both intention-to-treat and per protocol approach. The incidences of complete cure, relapsing, recurrent, and repeated peritonitis episodes will be compared. Expected results Based on our pilot study, we expect to find a significantly lower rate of relapsing, recurrent, and repeated peritonitis episodes in the Extended Group. By proving that "low-risk" peritonitis episodes require 3-week course of antibiotic therapy, our result will change the current recommendation and make treatment for 3 weeks course the standard of care.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03675854

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