Last updated on July 2019

Study on Cerebral Protection of Dexmedetomidine for Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury


Brief description of study

The aim of the study is to investigate whether dexmedetomidine could suppress catecholamine release into peripheral blood to prevent PSH attacks and to achieve neuroprotection.

Detailed Study Description

Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is a syndrome typically recognized in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury, characterized by paroxysmal increases in sympathetic activity such as elevated heart rate, increased blood pressure and respiratory rate, high temperature, excessive sweating and abnormal motor (posturing) activity.

This prospective study will include patients with traumatic brain injury,who will be divided into two groups, evaluated by the Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Assessment Measure (PSH-AM). Patients will also be evaluated with head CT.

The aim of the study is to investigate whether dexmedetomidine could suppress catecholamine release into peripheral blood to prevent PSH attacks and to achieve neuroprotection.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT04006054

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