Last updated on January 2020

Anti-inflammatory Nutritional Intervention in Patients With Fibromyalgia


Brief description of study

This is a randomized clinical trial, aimed to analyse the effects of a potentially anti-inflammatory nutritional intervention in disease assessment parameters, inflammatory markers, and quality of life of Fibromyalgia patients. Patients in the intervention group will adopt an anti-inflammatory diet and a diet with a low ingestion of fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs), for a 3 months period. Group control will adopt a diet based on general recommendations for healthy eating in accordance with the World Health Organization.

Detailed Study Description

The presence of low grade intestinal inflammation has been reported in Fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Other studies associate the persistence of symptoms described in FM to possible alterations of the intestinal microbiota composition, i.e. dysbiosis, with consequent existence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO). A sample of 100 female patients diagnosed with FM, followed-up at Portuguese Rheumathology Institute in Lisbon, will be distributed randomly in two groups. Group 1 will adopt an anti-inflammatory diet, which is characterized by the exemption of the intake of potentially inflammatory foods, namely gluten, dairy and ultra-processed foods, over a consecutive period of 3 months. During the first month, a low FODMAPs diet will be implemented, along with the anti-inflammatory diet, followed by the reintroduction of all fruits and vegetables over a consecutive period of 2 months, for a total of 3 months of intervention. Group 2 will adopt a diet based on general recommendations for healthy eating in accordance with the World Health Organization. The Ethics Committee of the Portuguese Institute of Rheumathology approved this intervention study.

The results of this study are expected to determine whether a change in patient nutrition helps to alleviate symptoms, which would optimize medical intervention.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT04007705

Recruitment Status: Closed


Brief Description Eligibility Contact Research Team


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