Last updated on December 2018

Stroke Survivors and Caregivers Using an Online Mindfulness-based Intervention Together


Brief description of study

Stroke survivors and their family caregivers often experience stress, anxiety, and depression. The psychological wellbeing of stroke survivors and family caregivers is thought to be interconnected and can have an important role to play in rehabilitation outcomes. Mindfulness meditation can help improve psychological wellbeing, but it often involves people attending groups by themselves and engagement can be poor. One solution is for stroke survivors and family caregivers to learn mindfulness meditation together online.

This study aims to explore the feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of mindfulness meditation delivered online for stroke survivor and family caregiver partnerships.

Detailed Study Description

Introduction Stroke survivors and their family caregivers often experience stress, anxiety, and depression. Research suggests the emotional wellbeing of the stroke survivor and family caregiver might be interconnected, which means optimum outcomes will only be achieved when they are supported as a partnership (Atteih, et al. 2015).

Mindfulness-Based Interventions (MBIs) can help psychological wellbeing, but usually involve people attending groups by themselves, which might not suit everyone. Sometimes accessing group-based MBI can be difficult and/or people might not want to learn MBI within a group environment (Wahbeh, et al. 2014). Web-based MBIs have become more readily available in recent years, but little attention has been given to partnership orientated web-based interventions. Research is needed to explore the potential effects of web-based MBI for stroke survivors and family caregiver partnerships (Bakas, et al. 2017). This study aims to explore the feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of web-based MBIs for stroke survivor and family caregiver partnerships.

Method Purposive sampling will be used to recruit community-dwelling stroke survivor-family caregiver partnerships (n=5 dyads). These partnerships will complete a four-week asynchronous tutor-led web-based MBI. The web-based MBI aligns with the eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (Kabat-Zinn and Hanh, 2009) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (Teasedale, et al. 2000) courses, but in a shorter format. The course involves ten online interactive videos (30 minutes each), twelve daily practice assignments (with supportive emails), five audio downloads, and online tools for reviewing progress.

The design will involve a mixed method multiple single-case (A-B) design: two-week baseline, four-week intervention, and four-week follow-up phases. Stroke survivors and family caregivers will complete the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) (Zigmond and Snaith, 1983) weekly to evaluate psychological wellbeing and clinical effectiveness. Paired semi-structured post-intervention interviews will be completed at follow-up and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis used to contextualize the results and explain the meaning associated with the findings.

Results Recruitment and completion data will be reported using descriptive statistics to help evaluate feasibility and appropriateness. HADS outcome data for stroke survivors and family caregivers will be presented in individual graphs and using raw data to facilitate future meta-analysis. Visual and statistical analysis of outcome data will be completed to evaluate clinical effectiveness, effect size, and whether any changes were statistically significant.

The Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis will be reported using relevant themes and participants' quotes to provide a coherent analysis of the feasibility, appropriateness, meaningfulness, and effectiveness of stroke survivors and family caregivers using web-based MBI.

Discussion The findings will inform the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical effectiveness of web-based MBI for stroke survivors and family caregivers partnerships. The study will explore the usefulness and meaning of learning MBI online and in a partnership. These findings could help determine whether using web-based MBI in a partnership has any therapeutic value for participants and help tailor such intervention for stroke survivor and family caregiver partnerships.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03473054

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

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Ben Parkinson, MSc

Glasgow Caledonian University
Glasgow, United Kingdom
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Recruitment Status: Open


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