Last updated on November 2018

Metabolomics Predict Therapy Response


Brief description of study

Complete resection is the mainstay of treatment for stage I-IIIA resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However rates of recurrence of disease are high, with five-year survival rates ranging between 73% (stage IA) and 24% (stage IIIA). Therefore, a prognostic biological marker that stratifies between NSCLC patients whom surgery cures versus patients in whom surgery would be futile due to early disease relapse after surgery is eagerly awaited.

The primary objective of this prospective study is to establish a prognostic marker of early disease progression after complete surgical resection in patients with stages I to IIIA NSCLC. For this purpose the investigator will compare the metabolic profile with disease progression or death within one year after complete surgical resection to the patients with a progression free survival. Furthermore the investigator will evaluate the changes in the metabolic profile after surgery and if changes in this metabolic profile over time can predict disease recurrence before it becomes clinically apparent.

Detailed Study Description

Introduction: Precision medicine relies on validated biomarkers that can accurately classify patients by their probable disease risk, prognosis and/or response to treatment. Metabolomics is particularly promising for biomarker development because altered metabolism is considered a hallmark of cancer. The measurement of the metabolomic plasma profile is cheap (+-50 EUR) and fast (+-17 min), with a high information throughput on a per sample base.

Rationale: Complete resection is the mainstay of treatment for stage I-IIIA resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However rates of recurrence of disease are high, with five-year survival rates ranging between 73% (stage IA) and 24% (stage IIIA). Therefore, a prognostic biological marker that stratifies between NSCLC patients whom surgery cures versus patients in whom surgery would be futile due to early disease relapse after surgery is eagerly awaited.

Study objective: The primary study hypothesis is that the metabolic plasma profile is a predictive marker of early disease progression after complete surgical resection in patients with pathological stages I to IIIA NSCLC. The secondary study hypothesis is that the level of dissimilarity between the metabolic profile before surgery and the metabolic profile after surgery, is a predictor for disease recurrence (in which the extreme case would be, that a normalization of the metabolic profile to the profile of a healthy person, is indicative of a good prognosis).

Study design: Prospective, interventional design

Study population: Stage I-IIIA NSCLC patients who will undergo complete surgical resection willing to provide a written informed consent.

Number of patients: 200 patients with stage I-IIIA NSCLC who will undergo thoracic surgery with a curative intent will be included.

Main study parameters/endpoints: Recurrence free survival, overall survival, metabolic phenotype, presence or absence of hot-spot mutations in tested proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in blood plasma, the tumor tissue and possibly positive lymph nodes, 43 items of the EORTC quality of life questionnaire C30 and LC13.

Nature and extent of the burden and risks associated with participation: Subjects will be asked to give consent to take 10-30 ml of blood at several moments throughout the disease course and in follow-up. Furthermore, the participants need to give their permission to use the resected tumor/lymph node tissue for genetic testing. Clinical parameters will be pooled in a database in a confidential way.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03736993

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

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Kurt Tournoy, MD, PhD

OLV ziekenhuis Aalst
Aalst, Belgium
8.72miles
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Recruitment Status: Open


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