Last updated on December 2018

QLB and Radical Cystectomy Postoperative Pain


Brief description of study

There are ca 1000 new cases of bladder cancer in Finland/year. The curative therapy for high risk bladder cancer is radical cystectomy. The golden standard is still an open surgery despite development of laparoscopic techniques. Epidural analgesia is considered as most effective for the treatment of postoperative pain. However, there is a need for other effective options, because epidural analgesia has some contraindications and risks for serious complications. Recently quadratus lumborum block has gained popularity in the treatment of postoperative pain after various surgeries in the area from hip to mamilla. It is more beneficial than other peripheral blocks, since it covers also the visceral nerves. Contrary to the need of epidural catether a single shot QLB has reported to last up to 48 hours.

Inadequately treated acute postoperative pain is considered as one of the main risk factors for persistent postoperative pain.

44 patients aging 18-85 will be recruited based on a power calculation. The primary outcome measure is the acute postoperative need for rescue analgesics. Secondary outcomes are acute pain (NRS scale), nausea, vomiting, mobilisation and longterm outcomes such as quality of life and persistent pain.

Detailed Study Description

44 patients, uindergoing radical cystectomy, aging 18-85 will be recruited based on a power calculation. The 44 patients will be divided in 2 groups, the intervention group receiving a quadratus lumborum block (75mg ropivacaine) and the no intervention group receiving the current standard care of our hospital -an epidural.

The primary outcome measure is the acute postoperative need for rescue analgesics. Secondary outcomes are acute pain (NRS scale), nausea, vomiting, mobilisation and longterm outcomes such as quality of life and persistent pain.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03328988

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Recruitment Status: Open


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