Last updated on September 2018

Lactose Intolerance and Cow's Milk Protein Allergy in Non-celiac Wheat Sensitivity Patients


Brief description of study

In the last few years a new clinical entity has emerged which includes patients who consider themselves to be suffering from problems caused by wheat and/or gluten ingestion, even though they do not have celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy. This clinical condition has been named non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), although in a recent article, the researchers suggested the term "non-celiac wheat sensitivity" (NCWS), because it is not known to date what component of wheat actually causes the symptoms. The clinical picture of NCWS is characterized by combined gastrointestinal (bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea and/or constipation, nausea, epigastric pain, gastroesophageal reflux, aphthous stomatitis) and extra-intestinal or systemic manifestations (headache, depression, anxiety, 'foggy mind,' tiredness, dermatitis or skin rash, fibromyalgia-like joint/muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, and anemia). Lactose intolerance and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) are two medical conditions with a very high prevalence in the general population, and there is a large overlap between NCWS symptoms and lactose intolerance and CMPA symptoms. Therefore, the aims of the present study are to investigate 1) the prevalence of positive lactose breath test and DBPC cow's milk protein challenge in NCWS patients with self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms related to milk and/or milk derivates ingestion, 2) the clinical, serological, and histological characteristics of NCWS patients with lactose intolerance and CMPA in comparison to NCWS patients without lactose intolerance and CMPA.

Detailed Study Description

In the last few years, a new clinical entity has emerged which includes patients who consider themselves to be suffering from problems caused by wheat and/or gluten ingestion, even though they do not have celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy. This clinical condition has been named non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), although in a recent article, the researchers suggested the term "non-celiac wheat sensitivity" (NCWS), because it is not known to date what component of wheat actually causes the symptoms. Other areas of doubt in NCWS regard its pathogenesis, while some papers reported intestinal immunologic activation, others linked NCWS to the dietary short chain carbohydrate (fermentable oligo-di-monosaccharides and polyols, FODMAPs) load. The researchers recently demonstrated that higher proportions of patients with NCWS develop autoimmune disorders, are antinuclear antibodies (ANA) positive, and show DQ2/DQ8 haplotypes compared with patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), supporting an immunologic involvement in NCWS. The clinical picture of NCWS is characterized by combined gastrointestinal (bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea and/or constipation, nausea, epigastric pain, gastroesophageal reflux, aphthous stomatitis) and extra-intestinal or systemic manifestations (headache, depression, anxiety, 'foggy mind,' tiredness, dermatitis or skin rash, fibromyalgia-like joint/muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, and anemia). Lactose intolerance and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) are two conditions with a very high prevalence in the general population and there is a large overlap between NCWS and lactose intolerance and CMPA symptoms. Therefore, the aims of the present study are to investigate 1) the prevalence of positive lactose breath test and DBPC cow's milk protein challenge in NCWS patients with self-reported gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms related to milk and/or milk derivates ingestion, 2) the clinical, serological, and histological characteristics of NCWS patients with lactose intolerance and CMPA in comparison to NCWS patients without lactose intolerance and CMPA.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03008252

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Recruitment Status: Open


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