Last updated on February 2018

Medication Reconciliation at Discharge: Impact on Patient's Care


Brief description of study

Patient's discharge from hospital is associated with iatrogenic events for 12 to 17% of patients. This risk may be linked with discontinuity of care between hospital physicians and Primary Care Physician (PCP). The investigators aim to assess in this study the impact of medication reconciliation at discharge associated with a patient's counseling session, both provided by a pharmacist, on patient's care after discharge. To demonstrate the interest of medication reconciliation at discharge we expect a reduction by 15% of the number of prescription changes not maintained by the PCP after discharge.

Detailed Study Description

Patient's discharge from hospital is associated with iatrogenic events for 12 to 17% of patients and may lead to further hospitalization. This risk may be linked with discontinuity of care between hospital physicians and Primary Care Physician (PCP) and from discrepancies between patient's current medications and drugs prescribed at discharge.

Preventing adverse drug events (ADEs) remains a patient safety priority not only in hospitals but also across the continuum of care for patients. Implementing medication reconciliation at all transitions in care is an effective strategy for preventing discrepancies and ADEs. Medication reconciliation prevents and corrects medication errors by promoting transmissions of complete and accurate information about medicines.

Furthermore, ADEs may be the result of a failure to understand and manage post-discharge care needs and can lead to hospital readmission.

We assume that medication reconciliation at discharge, secondarily transmitted to the PCP with a discharge counseling session between the patient and a clinical pharmacist could have a positive impact on the maintenance of therapeutic optimization decided by in-hospital practitioners.

In order to evaluate this assumption, we will conduct a randomized controlled study on 120 patients (as a reduction by 15% of the number of prescription changes not maintained by the PCP after discharge is expected).

The follow-up will last 1 month after discharge from hospital. The first prescription from the PCP will be collected and analyzed. In addition, patients and PCPs will be contacted by the pharmacist to answer specific questionnaires.

The primary objective of the study is to assess the impact of medication reconciliation at discharge associated with a patient's counseling session, both provided by a pharmacist, on patient's care after discharge.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03029052

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