Last updated on February 2018

Kinesiotaping in Lateral Epicondylitis


Brief description of study

The aim of this study is to compare the effects of kinesiology taping with exercise, sham taping with exercise and exercise alone for lateral epicondylitis.

Detailed Study Description

Lateral epicondylitis or tennis elbow is a often-encountered disorder of elbow which is characterized by tenderness and pain over lateral epicondylitis of humerus and grip weakness. The annual incidence of lateral epicondylitis has been reported to be %1-3 in general population. Lateral epicondylitis is commonly associated with repetitive overuse of wrist, activities including strong grip which in turn cause microtears and degenerative changes over the common origin of wrist and finger extensors on lateral epicondyle. New researches have shown that the underlying mechanism is degenerative rather than inflammatory. It has been proposed that the cause of pain may be mechanical discontinuity of collagen fibers or biochemical irritation that results from damaged tendon tissue that activates nociceptors. It has been suggested that eccentric loading has been shown to assist with tendon rehabilitation by improving collagen alignment and stimulating collagen cross-linkage formation, both of which can improve tensile strength.

Kinesio taping (KT) which is a new application of adhesive taping was designed by Kenzo Kase to avoid unwanted effects of conventional taping such as restricting range of motion (ROM) and limiting functional activities. The recommended tape application methods are outlined in 'Clinical Therapeutic Applications of the Kinesio Taping Method' 8. Elastic therapeutic tape has been designed to allow for a longitudinal stretch of up to 140% of its resting length and has been designed to approximate the elastic qualities of the human skin. In particular, the application of the tape over stretched muscle to create convolutions in the skin has been hypothesized to reduce pressure in the mechanoreceptors below the dermis, thereby decreasing nociceptive stimuli. Another mechanism which is claimed by the proponent of the tape is that convolutions are raised ridges of the tape and the skin that are thought to decompress underlying structures and allow for enhanced circulation by increased subcutaneous space. In the last few years, the use of KT has become increasingly popular in rehabilitation programs as an adjunct in the treatment. However, scientific evidence about its effect is insufficient.

The aim of this study is to compare the effects of kinesiology taping with exercise, sham taping with exercise and exercise alone for lateral epicondylitis.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03074500

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Recruitment Status: Open


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