Last updated on May 2018

Higher or Lower Dose Cladribine Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone in Treating Medically Less Fit Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myeloid Neoplasm


Brief description of study

This randomized pilot trial studies how well higher or lower dose cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone work in treating medically less fit patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid neoplasm. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone at higher or lower dose may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

Detailed Study Description

PRIMARY OBJECTIVES:

I. To evaluate the feasibility of randomizing medically less fit adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or analogous myeloid neoplasms to either intensive or non-intensive induction and post remission chemotherapy.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES:

I. To evaluate the attitude of patients and physicians toward randomization and explore reasons for treatment preference.

II. To evaluate whether the ability to assess fitness for intensive chemotherapy can be improved by an augmented treatment-related mortality (TRM) score that includes additional (co-morbidity) factors, and to compare the ability of physicians and the prediction algorithm(s) to assess the likelihood of early death.

III. To compare, within the limits of a pilot study, response, duration of response, and survival between patients receiving intensive and those receiving non-intensive chemotherapy.

IV. To describe the impact of treatment intensity on quality of life of patients undergoing chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML.

V. To describe the impact of treatment intensity on medical resource utilization and care cost of patients undergoing chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML.

OUTLINE: Patients agreeable to randomization are randomized to 1 of 2 treatment arms. Patients not agreeable to randomization receive treatment based on their preference.

ARM I (HIGHER-DOSE):

INDUCTION: Patients receive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) subcutaneously (SC) on days 0-5, higher dose cladribine intravenously (IV) over 2 hours on days 1-5, higher dose cytarabine IV over 2 hours on days 1-5, and higher dose mitoxantrone IV over 60 minutes on days 1-3. Treatment repeats every 6 weeks for up to 4 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

CONSOLIDATION: Patients who achieve complete response (CR)/CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) with up to 2 courses of Induction receive G-CSF, cladribine, and cytarabine as in Induction. Courses repeat every 6 weeks for up to 4 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

ARM II (LOWER-DOSE):

INDUCTION: Patients receive G-CSF SC on days 0-5, lower dose cladribine IV over 2 hours on days 1-5, lower dose cytarabine IV over 1 hour on days 1-5, and lower dose mitoxantrone IV over 60 minutes on days 1-3. Treatment repeats every 6 weeks for up to 12 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

CONSOLIDATION: Patients who achieve complete response (CR)/CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) with up to 6 courses of Induction receive G-CSF, cladribine, and cytarabine as in Induction. Courses repeat every 6 weeks for up to 12 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

After completion of study treatment, patients are followed up periodically for 5 years.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03012672

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

Start Over

Anna Halpern

Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium
Seattle, WA United States
  Connect »

Recruitment Status: Open


Brief Description Eligibility Contact Research Team


Receive Emails About New Clinical Trials!

Sign up for our FREE service to receive email notifications when clinical trials are posted in the medical category of interest to you.