Last updated on February 2019

Standard of Care Therapy With or Without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer


Brief description of study

This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and/or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and/or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.

Detailed Study Description

PRIMARY OBJECTIVES:

I. To determine whether ablation (through stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT] [stereotactic radiosurgery] and/or surgical resection of all known metastases) in oligometastatic breast cancer patients provides a sufficient signal for improved progression-free survival (PFS) to warrant full accrual to the Phase III portion of the trial. (Phase II-R) II. To determine whether ablation (through SBRT and/or surgical resection of all known metastases) in oligometastatic breast cancer patients significantly improves overall survival (OS). (Phase III)

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES:

I. To evaluate treated metastasis control according to tumor receptor status (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR], human epidermal growth factor receptor [HER]-2), use of chemotherapy, surgery vs. ablative therapy, and solitary metastasis vs. 2 metastasis (may expand to >= 2 to =< 4 following completion of a Phase I trial).

II. To evaluate whether the addition of ablative metastasis directed therapy significantly reduces the number of distant recurrences (new metastases) in patients who progress according to tumor receptor status (ER, PR, HER-2); use of chemotherapy, and solitary metastasis vs. 2 metastases (may expand to >= 2 to =< 4 following completion of the Phase I NRG-BR001 trial).

III. To evaluate adverse events in patients who receive ablative metastasis-directed therapy to all known metastases in addition to standard medical therapy alone.

IV. To explore the most appropriate and clinically relevant technological parameters to ensure quality and effectiveness throughout the radiation therapy processes, including imaging, simulation, target and critical structure definition, treatment planning, image guidance, and delivery.

TERTIARY OBJECTIVES:

I. To determine whether < 5 circulating tumor cells (CTCs) (per 7.5 ml of blood) is an independent prognostic (outcome) marker for improved PFS and OS in oligometastatic breast cancer.

II. To determine whether < 5 CTCs (per 7.5 ml of blood) is an independent predictive (response to therapy) marker for improved PFS and OS in oligometastatic breast cancer.

III. To determine whether eliminating CTCs (0/7.5 ml of blood in patients with at least 2 CTCs at registration) is both a prognostic and predictive marker for improved PFS and OS.

IV. To evaluate the prognostic and predictive properties of CTC count as a continuous measure of PFS and OS.

V. To store material for retrospective analysis of circulating tumor deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA).

VI. To store material for retrospective analysis of circulating micro-ribonucleic acid (RNA).

OUTLINE: Patients are randomized to 1 of 2 treatment arms.

ARM 1: Patients continue to receive their current planned systemic therapy at the discretion of the treating physician.

ARM 2: Patients continue to receive their current planned systemic therapy at the discretion of the treating physician. Patients also undergo stereotactic radiosurgery in 1, 3, or 5 fractions within 3 weeks and/or surgery at the discretion of the treating physician.

ARM 1: Patients are followed every 3 months from randomization to 2 years. ARM 2: Patients are followed 25-35 days post-ablation, every 3 months from randomization to 2 years, and then yearly thereafter.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT02364557

Find a site near you

Start Over

Recruitment Status: Open


Brief Description Eligibility Contact Research Team


Receive Emails About New Clinical Trials!

Sign up for our FREE service to receive email notifications when clinical trials are posted in the medical category of interest to you.