Last updated on March 2018

Analgesic Efficacy of Morphine Alone or Combined With Paracetamol and/or Ibuprofen for Long-bones Fractures in Children


Brief description of study

The main objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of two drugs: paracetamol and ibuprofen in association with morphine, compared with morphine alone on analgesia in children seen in the emergency department for a long-bone fracture and also to study the potential synergic effect of the association paracetamol and ibuprofen.

Detailed Study Description

Long-bone fractures are a very common complain for visits in paediatric emergency departments. Since these fractures are often very painful, morphine is considered the cornerstone treatment in case of severe pain. Very few data are available concerning the assessment of analgesic treatment in this condition. In our previous study, less than 50% of patients with a limb fracture had a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) 30 mm after morphine administration. Thus, one study make the hypothesis that the use of a combination of morphine and/or paracetamol and/or NSAID could be an effective and safe option for the treatment of pain due to long bone fractures. We undertake to compare different combinations of paracetamol and ibuprofen with morphine to determine the efficacy and safety of these strategies in emergency department paediatric patients with acute traumatic limb pain.

The main objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of two drugs: paracetamol and ibuprofen in association with morphine, compared with morphine alone on analgesia in children seen in the emergency department for a long-bone fracture and also to study the potential synergic effect of the association paracetamol and ibuprofen.

Second objectives are

  • to compare the long term analgesic efficacy of 4 analgesic regimens a)ibuprofen/morphine, b)paracetamol/morphine, c)ibuprofen/paracetamol/morphine and d)morphine for long bone fracture management in the paediatric emergency department.
  • To assess the tolerance of these 4 regimens.

The study is considered as a success if children 2-6 years (6 years included) have a pain score Evendol < 5 and children 7-17 years (17 years included) have a pain score assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) 30 without additional analgesic treatment 30 minutes after drug administration.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT02477007

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

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Hélène Chappuy, MD, PhD

Paediatric emergency Armand Trousseau hospital
Paris, France
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Recruitment Status: Open


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