Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • participants needed
    420
  • sponsor
    Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology
Updated on 22 November 2020
Investigator
Steven K. Bergstrom
Primary Contact
Kaiser Permanente-Oakland (9.2 mi away) Contact
+89 other location
paclitaxel
cancer
stem cell transplantation
filgrastim
etoposide
carboplatin
tumor cells
g-csf
chemotherapy drugs
cancer chemotherapy
pegfilgrastim
ifosfamide

Summary

This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.

Description

The study is an international collaboration with European sites. Collaborators on the study include the National Cancer Institute, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Movember Foundation. Randomization will be stratified by region (North America and Europe) and by modified IPFSG (International Prognostic Factor Study Group) risk classification (low, intermediate and high). The primary and secondary objectives are described below.

Primary Objective:

  1. To compare the overall survival in patients treated with conventional-dose chemotherapy using the TIP regimen with high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) plus autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) using the TI-CE regimen as initial salvage treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory germ cell tumors (GCT)

Secondary Objectives:

  1. To compare the progression-free survival (PFS) of patients treated with initial salvage HDCT with TI-CE versus initial salvage CDCT with TIP
  2. To compare the favorable response rate (FRR) of patients treated with initial salvage HDCT with TI-CE versus initial salvage CDCT with TIP
  3. To compare the toxicity, including treatment-related mortality, associated with high-dose chemotherapy and ASCT using TI-CE compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy using TIP as initial salvage treatment for patients with relapsed or refractory GCT
  4. To prospectively evaluate the IPFSG scoring system as a predictor of outcome to initial salvage therapy in patients with relapsed or refractory GCT. In this trial, randomization will be stratified by a modification of their IPFSG category and we will prospectively evaluate whether or not actual outcomes vary by risk group in the appropriate manner (low risk patients have higher OS than high-risk group).
  5. To evaluate the association between tumor marker decline rates of Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) with OS and PFS.

Treatment is to continue until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or completion of all protocol treatment.

Details
Treatment G-CSF, cisplatin, ifosfamide, carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Etoposide Phosphate, Pegylated G-CSF, stem cell reinfusion
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT02375204
SponsorAlliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology
Last Modified on22 November 2020

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