Last updated on February 2019

Immune Cell Dysfunction in Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis


Brief description of study

Through bio-sampling this study investigates the relationship between the frequency and function of the cells of a patients immune system and how these change and impact on the outcome of alcoholic hepatitis. the investigators will examine the role of different cells of the immune system and how they may determine the outcome of this condition. The investigators will also look at how established treatment strategies impact on the frequency and function of these cell subsets.

Detailed Study Description

Through bio-sampling this study investigates the relationship between the frequency and function of the cells of a patients immune system and how these change and impact on the outcome of alcoholic hepatitis. The investigators will examine the role of different cells of the immune system and how they may determine the outcome of this condition. The investigators will also look at how established treatment strategies impact on the frequency and function of these cell subsets.

Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the developed world and results in the death of 2.5 million people annually. It is a causal factor in more than 60 major types of diseases and injuries and approximately 4.5% of the global burden of disease and injury is attributable to alcohol. Acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) is perhaps the most florid form of ALD and the leading cause of mortality in these patients is the development of sepsis which occurs in up to 40% of these patients and has a mortality rate of 50%.

By gaining a better understanding of the relationship between elements of the immune system and the progression to severe alcoholic hepatitis, it will allow the formulation of more effective treatment strategies for this condition.

Patients who agree to participate in this study will have an extra 40mls of blood drawn for scientific studies at the same time as routine blood samples are taken as part of their ongoing care.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT02275195

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