Iowa Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Center Hybrid L24 and Standard Cochlear Implants in Profoundly Deaf Infants

  • STATUS
    Recruiting
  • End date
    Sep 25, 2022
  • participants needed
    15
  • sponsor
    Bruce J Gantz
Updated on 25 January 2021

Summary

The purpose of this feasibility study is to evaluate whether implantation of one Nucleus L24 electrode array and one FDA approved standard-length device in the contralateral ear can provide useful binaural hearing in pediatric subjects who have bilateral severe to profound hearing loss, meeting the criteria for cochlear implantation. Unlike a conventional cochlear implant, the Nucleus L24 is expected to preserve the regions of the cochlear partition that are apical to the electrode, thus leaving them available for possible future advances in the field of otolaryngology and hearing devices, such as mammalian hair cell regeneration techniques or improved implantable hearing devices. Whether or not this group of children will be able to take advantage of future hair cell regeneration strategies is yet to be determined and will have to wait for future development. At this time there are no accurate imaging strategies available to identify preservation of the scala media. Ultra thin micro CT scanning is in development, however the level of radiation delivery to the subject is too great to be considered for clinical use. When imaging strategies become available to determine cellular structure of the inner ear, they will be applied to this group of subjects. The Nucleus L24 array stimulates the basal turn of the cochlea, in an attempt to preserve the middle and apical regions of the scala media.

Description

The purpose of this feasibility study is to evaluate whether a Nucleus L24 and a FDA approved standard-length device in the contralateral ear can provide useful binaural hearing in pediatric subjects who have bilateral profound hearing loss, meeting the criteria for cochlear implantation. Unlike a conventional cochlear implant, the Nucleus L24 is designed to preserve the regions of the cochlear partition that are apical to the electrode, thus leaving them available for possible future advances in the field of otolaryngology and hearing devices, such as mammalian hair cell regeneration techniques or improved implantable hearing devices. The Nucleus L24 (16 mm) array stimulates the basal turn of the cochlea, in an attempt to preserve the middle and apical regions of the scala media.

The study will be conducted as a repeated-measure, single-subject experiment. A single-subject research design (in which each participant serves as his or her own control) is appropriate because it accommodates the heterogeneity that characterizes hearing-impaired populations. Blinding or masking procedures are not included in the design, as it is not possible to conceal the presence or absence of a cochlear implant from device recipients and/or clinical investigators.

Preoperatively, candidates will be assessed with their current amplification to evaluate their appropriateness for entrance into the study. The candidates' audiometric configuration must meet the above inclusion criteria. That is, the candidate must have a profound sensorineural hearing loss from 250 to 8000 Hz. Prior to testing, the appropriateness of the hearing aid fitting will be assessed and adjustments made if necessary. In cases where amplification has not been used for more than one year, new hearing aids will be fit, worn for a minimum three-month trial and the participants re-evaluated to confirm continuance with the study.

Fifteen infants will receive one Nucleus L24 array and a FDA approved standard-length array on contralateral ears. The investigator will alternate every other subject between the right and left ears as to which ear gets the Nucleus L24. Postoperatively, the right ear only, left ear only, and the bilateral listening modes will be compared with repeated testing through five years of age of the child. These comparisons will help to evaluate the effects of bilateral stimulation using a shorter electrode cochlear implant to possibly preserve the scala media, organ of Corti, and supporting cells for future medical interventions and a standard length implant on the contralateral ear. In addition, the investigator will attempt to compare speech perception and speech/language measure results with age-matched children implanted with standard-length bilateral devices.

Details
Condition Cochlear Implants, Child, Bilateral hearing loss
Treatment Hybrid L24
Clinical Study IdentifierNCT03156465
SponsorBruce J Gantz
Last Modified on25 January 2021

Eligibility

Yes No Not Sure

Inclusion Criteria

Is your age between 1 yrs and 1 yrs?
Gender: Male or Female
Do you have any of these conditions: Cochlear Implants or Bilateral hearing loss or Child?
Do you have any of these conditions: Child or Cochlear Implants or Bilateral hearing loss?
Twelve to twenty-four months of age at the time of implantation
Audiometric thresholds for frequencies 250 to 8000 Hz in the profound hearing range bilaterally. The type of hearing loss must be categorized as sensorineural in nature
English spoken as a primary language (mono-lingual English speaking family, where English is the primary language)
Willingness to comply with all study requirements
Minimum of three-month hearing aid trial with appropriately fit hearing aids
Patent cochlea and normal cochlear anatomy as shown by a CT scan. It is standard clinical practice to perform a CT scan on any patient pursuing cochlear implantation

Exclusion Criteria

Medical or psychological conditions that contraindicate undergoing surgery
Ossification or any other cochlear anomaly that might prevent complete insertion of the electrode array
Developmental disabilities or other conditions that would prevent or restrict participation in the audiological evaluations and clinical trial
Hearing loss of neural or central origin
Unrealistic expectations on the part of the candidate and/or candidate's family, regarding the possible benefits, risks, and limitations that are inherent to the surgical procedure(s) and prosthetic devices
Unwillingness or inability of the candidate to comply with all investigational requirements
Active middle ear infection
Clear my responses

How to participate?

Step 1 Connect with a site
What happens next?
  • You can expect the study team to contact you via email or phone in the next few days.
  • Sign up as volunteer to help accelerate the development of new treatments and to get notified about similar trials.

You are contacting

Investigator Avatar
Name

Primary Contact

site
Name

Phone Email

0/250
Please verify that you are not a bot.

Additional screening procedures may be conducted by the study team before you can be confirmed eligible to participate.

Learn more

If you are confirmed eligible after full screening, you will be required to understand and sign the informed consent if you decide to enroll in the study. Once enrolled you may be asked to make scheduled visits over a period of time.

Learn more

Complete your scheduled study participation activities and then you are done. You may receive summary of study results if provided by the sponsor.

Learn more

Similar trials to consider

Loading...

Not finding what you're looking for?

Every year hundreds of thousands of volunteers step forward to participate in research. Sign up as a volunteer and receive email notifications when clinical trials are posted in the medical category of interest to you.

Sign up as volunteer

user name

Added by • 

 • 

Private

Reply by • Private
Loading...

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet consectetur, adipisicing elit. Ipsa vel nobis alias. Quae eveniet velit voluptate quo doloribus maxime et dicta in sequi, corporis quod. Ea, dolor eius? Dolore, vel!

  The passcode will expire in None.
Loading...

No annotations made yet

Add a private note
  • abc Select a piece of text from the left.
  • Add notes visible only to you.
  • Send it to people through a passcode protected link.
Add a private note