Last updated on December 2018

Continuous Hyperosomolar Therapy for Traumatic Brain-injured Patients


Brief description of study

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and severe prolonged disability. Intracranial hypertension (ICH) is a critical risk factor of bad outcomes after TBI. Continuous infusion of hyperosmolar therapy has been proposed for the prevention or the treatment of ICH. Whether an early administration of continuous hyperosmolar therapy improves long term outcomes is uncertain. The aim of the current study is to assess the efficiency and the safety of continuous hyperosmolar therapy in TBI patients.

The COBI trial is the first randomized controlled trial powered to investigate whether continuous hyperosmolar therapy in TBI patients improve long term recovery.

Hypothesis

Patients treated with early continuous hyperosmolar therapy have reduced morbidity and mortality rates compared to those receiving standard care alone after traumatic brain injury.

Research Questions

  1. Does early continuous hyperosmolar therapy reduce morbidity and mortality rates at 3 and 6 months after TBI assessed by the GOSE questionnaire?
  2. Does early continuous hyperosmolar therapy prevent intracranial hypertension?

Detailed Study Description

Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and severe prolonged disability. Intracranial hypertension (ICH) is a critical risk factor of bad outcomes after TBI.

Continuous infusion of hyperosmolar therapy has been proposed for the prevention or the treatment of ICH. Whether an early administration of continuous hyperosmolar therapy improves long term outcomes is uncertain. The aim of the current study is to assess the efficiency and the safety of continuous hyperosmolar therapy in TBI patients.

Methods The COBI (Continuous hyperosmolar therapy in traumatic brain-injured patients) trial is a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label, two-arms study with blinded adjudication of primary outcome. Three hundred and seventy patients hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit with a traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale 12 and abnormal brain CT-scan) are randomized in the first 24 hours following trauma to standard care or continuous hyperosmolar therapy (NaCl 20%) plus standard care. Continuous hyperosmolar therapy is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to prevent intracranial hypertension. The primary outcome is the score on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS-E) at 6 months. The treatment effect is estimated with ordinal logistic regression adjusted for pre-specified prognostic factors and expressed as a common odds ratio.

Discussion The COBI trial is the first randomized controlled trial powered to investigate whether continuous hyperosmolar therapy in TBI patients improve long term recovery.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03143751

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