Last updated on February 2018

The Circadian Rhythm in CusHing SyndrOme in Active Phase and dUring RemiSsion (TheHOURS)


Brief description of study

This is an observational, open, prospective multi-centre study designed to evaluate melatonin and cortisol circadian rhythm, immunological profile and anthropometric parameters in Cushing Syndrome patients during active Remission state.

Detailed Study Description

Cushing Syndrome is a severe condition caused by prolonged exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids.

This is a disease with high morbidity and mortality due to metabolic, cardiovascular, coagulative, psychiatric complications of hypercortisolism.

The loss of circadian secretion of cortisol is one of the most sensitive and specific diagnostic features of Cushing's Syndrome that normalizes during remission. The evaluation of the circadian rhythm of cortisol is one of the diagnostic tests recommended by the guidelines to evaluate the state of the disease's activity.

Studies in literature have shown several correlations between states of hypercortisolism and circadian secretion of melatonin, displaying reduced melatonin secretion throughout the day and the suppression of circadian rhythm of cortisol. However, the dynamics of the normalization of melatonin circadian rhythm during remission from Cushing syndrome are unclear.

Therefore, the aim of our study is to evaluate the changes in circadian secretion of melatonin in Cushing's syndrome during active disease and during remission (3 and 6 months), according to the rational scientific influence of endogenous hypercortisolism on the function of the pineal gland. In addition, the changes in circadian secretion of cortisol, of mononuclear cells of the blood (PBMC) and of anthropometric-metabolic parameters, will be analyzed.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03343470

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Recruitment Status: Open


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