Last updated on February 2018

Nicotinamide Treatment for Lupus-associated Skin Lesions in Lupus Erythematosus


Brief description of study

This clinical study will test the efficacy and safety of nicotinamide for lupus-associated skin lesions refractory to the treatment of hydroxychloroquine plus low-dose corticosteroids in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Detailed Study Description

Backgrounds: Lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease affecting various organs. Lupus-associated skin lesions are the dominant clinical manifestations of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and also occur in 70%~80% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and usually involve the sunlight-exposure sites such as the face, neck and hands, which affects the personal appearance dramatically and causes substantial psychological impact to the patients.

While antimalarials such as hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) have been widely used as a first-line treatment for lupus-associated skin lesions, 30% of patients with lupus do not respond to this medication. Other available therapies such as corticosteroids and thalidomide can also be applied, however, their toxic side effects limit the clinical use. Recent studies by the investigators have shown that nicotinamide, a water-soluble vitamin whose side effects are considered as minimal, can protect MRL/lpr mice (a lupus-like mouse model) from skin lesions and autoantibody production. Thus it is hypothesized that nicotinamide treatment could be a novel therapy for lupus-associated skin lesions in patients with LE.

Design of Study: This is a single center, uncontrolled, open-label study to assess the efficacy and safety of nicotinamide for lupus-associated skin lesions refractory to the treatment of HCQ plus low-dose corticosteroids in patients with CLE or SLE.

Methods: For CLE or SLE patients with lupus-associated skin lesions scoring >=4 on the Revised Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (RCLASI) that have been refractory to the treatment of HCQ plus low-dose corticosteroids (<=0.5 mg/kg/d) during the past two months, oral nicotinamide (500 mg twice daily) will be given consecutively for 3 months while the current regimen including HCQ and corticosteroids be maintained without change. The end points include clinical response and immunological changes, as well as safety.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03260166

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

Start Over

Recruitment Status: Open


Brief Description Eligibility Contact Research Team


Receive Emails About New Clinical Trials!

Sign up for our FREE service to receive email notifications when clinical trials are posted in the medical category of interest to you.