Last updated on August 2018

Study Comparing Ticagrelor With Aspirin for Prevention of Vascular Events in Patients Undergoing CABG


Brief description of study

The primary objective of this study ist to test the hypothesis that ticagrelor is superior to Aspirin (ASA) fort he prevention of major cardio- and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) in patients undergoing artery bypass operation.

The primary efficiacy MACCE-endpoint is the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, recurent revascularisation, and stroke at twelve month after coronary artery bypass operation.

Detailed Study Description

For stable patients who underwent coronary bypass operation, Aspirin alone currently represents the gold standard of antiplatelet treatment.

The CABG substudy of the PLATO-trial (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0904327) comprising more than 1200 patients has convincingly shown a high significant reduction of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality for patients recieving Aspirin and Ticagrelor as compared to those subjects randomized to Aspirin plus Clopidogrel. Moreover the results of the PLATO CABG substudy showed that benefits of Ticagrelor increase with decreasing Aspirin doses. Therefore Ticagrelor monotherapy (2x 90mg/day) appears to offer the best balance of safety with anticipated improved efficacy over Aspirin (1x 100mg/day) alone, but until now there are no further data available to support this hypothesis.

Hence this study (TiCAB) is assigned as a pivotal efficacy and safety study of Ticagrelor in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass operation and to test the hypothesis that ticagrelor is superior to Aspirin for the prevention of major cardio- and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) in this patient population.

The TiCAB trial is designed as a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel group, phase III, multicenter study, comparing the efficacy and safety of Ticagrelor 90mg administered twice daily with Aspirin 100mg once daily, for the prevention of MACCE within the first year after CABG operation.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT01755520

Recruitment Status: Closed


Brief Description Eligibility Contact Research Team


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