Last updated on February 2018

A Trial of Everolimis in Patients With Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma.


Brief description of study

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for more than 200,000 new cases of cancer and over 100,000 cancer deaths annually in the World (Ferlay, et al., 2004). It is estimated that there were about 15,000 new cases of RCC in the region that excludes the Americas, European Union and Japan. Renal cell carcinomas arise from the proximal tubal epithelium are more common in males than in females with an overall lifetime risk of 1 in 75 and a median age of diagnosis of 65 years.

Everolimus (Certican) has been approved since 2003 in more than 60 countries for the prevention of organ rejection in patients with renal and cardiac transplantation. Everolimus (RAD001) is a derivative of rapamycin, which acts as a signal transduction inhibitor. It targets mTOR, a key protein kinase regulating cell growth, proliferation, and survival. The mTOR pathway activity is modulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B AKT (AKT) pathway, a pathway known to be deregulated in numerous human cancers. RAD001 (Afinitor) has been investigated as an anticancer agent based on its potential to act:

  • directly on the tumor cells by inhibiting tumor cell growth and proliferation;
  • indirectly by inhibiting angiogenesis leading to reduced tumor vascularity (via potent inhibition of tumor cell hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) activity, VEGF production, and VEGF-induced proliferation of endothelial cells).

Primary: To evaluate the PFS rate over time.

Secondary
  • To evaluate the disease control rate (stable disease [SD] + partial response [PR] + complete response [CR]);
  • To evaluate the objective response rate (ORR; where ORR = CR + PR) and duration;
  • To describe the safety profile of RAD001.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT01206764

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Recruitment Status: Open


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