National Human Genome Research Institute

NIH to expand critical catalog for genomics research

Monday, February 6, 2017

The NIH plans to expand its Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project, a genomics resource used by many scientists to study human health and disease. Funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of NIH, the ENCODE Project is generating a catalog of all the genes and regulatory elements—the parts of the genome that control whether genes are active or not—in humans and select model organisms. With four years of additional support, NHGRI builds on a long-standing commitment to developing freely available genomics resources for use by the scientific community.

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NIH funds new studies on the impact of genomic information

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Four new grants from the National Institutes of Health will support research on the ethical, legal and social questions raised by advances in genomics research and the increasing availability of genomic information. The awards will fund researchers at interdisciplinary centers through the National Human Genome Research Institute’s (NHGRI) Centers of Excellence in Ethical, Legal and Social Implications Research (CEER) program.

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NIH Common Fund launches biomed programs

Monday, October 5, 2015

The NIH Common Fund has awarded more than $54 million in fiscal year 2015 to launch projects in four broad scientific areas: the Glycoscience Program, the 4D Nucleome Program, the Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Program and the Science of Behavior Change Program. The Common Fund planning process identifies major challenges that impede progress in research and emerging areas of science that promise to change the way people think about health and disease or the way prevention or treatment is approached. Common Fund programs that emerge are goal-driven, with deliverables expected within a five to 10 year period. The 2015 awards represented first-year funding of a multiyear program.

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NIH seeks ways to combine genomic information and EHRs

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

A dozen awards from the NIH will support research that incorporates DNA sequence information into electronic medical records. The goal of research conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is to better understand the genomic basis of disease and to tailor medical care to individual patients based on their genomic differences.

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ArQule, NIH collaborate to develop ARQ 092 in Proteus syndrome

Friday, November 14, 2014

ArQule, a Woburn, Mass.-based biotech company engaged in the R&D of next-generation, small-molecule cancer therapeutics, has formed an agreement with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the NIH, providing for the clinical development of ARQ 092, an orally available, selective small molecule inhibitor of AKT, in Proteus syndrome, a rare disease characterized by overgrowth of the skeleton, skin, adipose tissue and central nervous system.

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NIH awards $64M for the understanding of cell pathways, development of new therapies

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the NIH has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS).  Discovering such cell responses will improve scientists’ understanding of cell pathways and aid in the development of new therapies for many diseases.

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Scientists looking across human, fly and worm genomes find shared biology

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Researchers analyzing human, fly, and worm genomes have found that these species have a number of key genomic processes in common, reflecting their shared ancestry.  The findings, appearing in the journal Nature, offer insights into embryonic development, gene regulation and other biological processes vital to understanding human biology and disease. 

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NIH awards $14.5M to research groups studying DNA sequencing techniques

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

A number of micro-sized technologies—such as nanopores and microfluidics—are among the approaches researchers will use to develop high-quality, low-cost DNA sequencing technology through new grants from the NIH. The grants, which total approximately $14.5 million to eight research teams over two to four years as funds become available, are the last to be awarded by the Advanced DNA Sequencing Technology program of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), a part of NIH.

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NIH adds six clinical sites in Undiagnosed Diseases Network

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

The NIH has awarded grants to six medical centers around the country to select from the most difficult-to-solve medical cases and together develop effective approaches to diagnose them. The new clinical sites added to the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) will conduct clinical evaluation and scientific investigation in cases that involve patients with prolonged, undiagnosed conditions.

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