Karolinska Institute

Johnson & Johnson Innovation inks 17 collaborations

Friday, June 12, 2015

Johnson & Johnson Innovation has announced 17 new collaborations with research institutions and healthcare companies, bringing the total number of collaborations formed since the 2013 launch of Johnson & Johnson Innovation to more than 200. Johnson & Johnson Innovation seeks to identify and advance scientific innovation across the Johnson & Johnson segments of Pharmaceutical, Medical Devices and Consumer businesses.

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Report: Transparency, cooperation help reduce high prices for new medicines

Friday, March 27, 2015

As the number of new medicines introduced in Europe rises, governments are finding it increasingly difficult to afford them, according to a comprehensive study released today by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. The study illustrates the challenges for national health systems, with specific examples, and shows that few countries in the WHO European Region have mechanisms in place to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of new drugs; this hampers the value-assessment and decision-making processes.

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Science for Life Laboratory forms Swedish National Center

Monday, February 9, 2015

Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) has established the Swedish National Center for Single-Cell Biology. The center features six C1TM systems, three CyTOF 2 systems and a Biomark HD system, making SciLifeLab one of the preeminent users of the full line of Fluidigm’s single-cell technologies in the world. Fluidigm develops, manufactures and markets life science analytical and preparatory systems for growth markets such as single-cell biology and production genomics. Fluidigm products are provided for research use only.

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Moderna, Karolinska Institute to collaborate on messenger RNA therapeutics

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Moderna Therapeutics, a Cambridge, Mass.-based pharma, has formed a strategic, long-term collaboration with Karolinska Institute (KI) and Karolinska University Hospital (KUH), both in Sweden, for the discovery and development of innovative drugs using Moderna’s messenger RNA (mRNA) Therapeutics technology. mRNA Therapeutics enable the in vivo production of both intracellular proteins and secreted proteins.

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Cancer Core Europe consortium launches

Friday, September 26, 2014

Cancer Core Europe—a consortium to address the cancer care/research continuum challenge, has launched. Its members are Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris; Cambridge Cancer Center, based in the U.K.; Karolinska Institute, of Stockholm, Sweden; the Netherlands Cancer InstituteVall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), of Barcelona, Spain; and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and its National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT).

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International Progressive MS Alliance awards $28.4M in research grants

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The International Progressive MS Alliance has awarded its first round of 22 research grants to investigators in nine countries, with the goal of removing barriers to developing treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). The alliance is a worldwide collaborative focused on finding solutions to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis that have so far eluded the scientific community.

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Chiltern partners with Karolinska Development

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Global CRO Chiltern International has partnered with Karolinska Development, a Sweden-based life science investment company. Karolinska Development aims to create value for patients, researchers, investors and society by developing innovations from world class science into products that can be sold or out-licensed with high returns. An exclusive deal flow agreement with Karolinska Institutet Innovations, along with other cooperation agreements with universities, delivers a continuous flow of innovations.

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Study finds children born prematurely face higher risk of retinal detachment

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Children born extremely prematurely have up to a 19 times greater risk of retinal detachment later in life than peers born at term, according to a Swedish study published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. In the first large population-based, long-term investigation of the association between preterm birth and later retinal detachment, the research determined that birth before 32 weeks is associated with increased risks of retinal detachment in childhood, adolescence and young adult life. The study’s findings indicate the need for ophthalmologic follow-up in children and adults born extremely and very prematurely. The U.S. has the sixth largest number of premature births, with more than 500,000 premature babies born each year.

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