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Bristol-Myers Squibb, UCLA enter immuno-oncology collaboration

Monday, December 14, 2015

Bristol-Myers Squibb has entered into a collaboration agreement with UCLA as part of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Immuno-Oncology Rare Population Malignancy (I-O RPM) research program in the U.S. The I-O RPM research program is a multi-institutional initiative with academic-based cancer centers focused on the clinical investigation of immuno-oncology therapeutics as potential treatment options for patients with high risk, poor prognostic cancers, defined as a rare population malignancy.

Bristol-Myers Squibb and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA will conduct a range of early-phase clinical studies as part of the I-O RPM research program, and Bristol-Myers Squibb will fund positions within UCLA’s fellowship program in the UCLA Division of Hematology/Oncology.

“The I-O RPM research program is an important complement to Bristol-Myers Squibb’s broad research and development program for immuno-oncology,” said Laura Bessen, M.D., head of U.S. Medical, Bristol-Myers Squibb. “We look forward to working with UCLA in an effort to continue advancing the science in this innovative field of research and cancer treatment.”

Immuno-oncology is an innovative approach to cancer research and treatment that is designed to harness the body’s own immune system to fight cancer. The I-O RPM research program focuses on significant areas of high unmet need marked by poor outcomes among patients with rare population malignancies. A rare population malignancy is a subpopulation within a higher incident disease population. Those patients have aggressive disease with an increased potential for early metastasis to multiple sites and/or are initially refractory or subject to early recurrences with conventional cancer therapies. Existing clinical research provide a strong rationale for further research into the potential of immunotherapies for those cancers.

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