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November 10, 2014

Bristol-Myers Squibb reported results from a phase II, single-arm, open-label study of Opdivo (nivolumab) in patients with advanced squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have progressed after at least two prior systemic treatments with 65% receiving three or more prior therapies (n=117). The trial, Checkmate -063, was designed to assess advanced squamous cell NSCLC patients who progressed after both platinum-based therapy and at least one additional systemic therapy, with an ECOG Performance Status of zero or one. Subjects were treated with Opdivo as a single agent 3mg/kg by intravenous infusion every two weeks until disease progression or treatment discontinuation (n=117). With approximately 11 months of minimum follow up, the objective response rate (ORR, the study’s primary endpoint) was 15% (95% CI = 8.7, 22.2) as assessed by an independent review committee (IRC) using RECIST 1.1 criteria, and the median duration of response was not reached. The estimated one-year survival rate was 41% (95% CI = 31.6, 49.7) and median overall survival (mOS) was 8.2 months (95% CI = 6.05, 10.91). Grade 3-4 drug-related adverse events (AEs) were reported in 17.1% of patients. The most common Grade 3-4 AEs (greater than or equal to 2%) were fatigue (4.3%), pneumonitis (3.4%) and diarrhea (2.6%). Discontinuations due to drug-related AEs of any grade occurred in 12% of patients, and there were two drug-related deaths in patients with multiple co-morbidities and in the setting of progressive disease.

October 20, 2014

Boehringer Ingelheim issued results of a phase III trial of afatinib v. erlotinib in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung. In the randomized, open-label trial, 795 patients with stage IIIB/IV SCC of the lung were randomized 1:1 to receive afatinib or erlotinib until disease progression. The planned primary analysis was based on 414 progression-free survival (PFS) events by independent review in the first 669 patients randomized (afatinib: 335, erlotinib: 334) while recruitment was ongoing. Afatinib significantly reduced the risk of disease progression by 18% when compared to erlotinib and delayed tumor growth (PFS by independent review: 2.4 v. 1.9 months; HR=0.82; p=0.043). Treatment with afatinib showed improvement in the secondary endpoint of disease control rate (DCR) compared to erlotinib (DCR: 45.7% v. 36.8%; p=0.020). Objective response rate was 4.8% in the afatinib arm v. 3% in the erlotinib arm (p=0.233). More patients reported an improvement in their global health status/quality of life (p=0.026) and cough (p=0.01) with afatinib v. erlotinib; no difference was observed with pain (p=1.0) and dyspnea (p=0.298) between groups. There was no significant difference in the time to deterioration across these four measures. The overall rate of severe (>/= grade 3) adverse events was comparable between both therapies. Incidence of severe adverse events was 50.2% in patients treated with afatinib compared to 49.1% with erlotinib. A higher incidence of severe diarrhea and stomatitis was observed in patients treated with afatinib compared to erlotinib (severe diarrhea: 9% v. 2%; stomatitis: 3% v. 0%), while there was a higher incidence of severe rash/acne observed with erlotinib compared to afatinib (9% v. 6%).

Puma Biotechnology issued results of a phase II trial of PB272 (neratinib) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with HER2 mutations. In the trial, patients with confirmed stage IIIB or stage IV NSCLC with documented somatic HER2 mutations were randomized to receive either oral neratinib monotherapy, 240mg per day, or the combination of oral neratinib, 240mg daily, with intravenous temsirolimus administered at a dose of 8mg per week. A total of 27 patients completed the first stage of the trial; 13 of these patients received neratinib monotherapy and 14 of these patients received the combination of neratinib plus temsirolimus. Results showed that of the 13 patients who received neratinib monotherapy, no patient experienced a partial response, seven (54%) patients achieved stable disease and four (31%) patients achieved clinical benefit (defined as a partial response or stable disease for 12 or more weeks). For the 14 patients who received the combination of neratinib plus temsirolimus, three (21%) patients experienced a partial response, 11 (79%) patients experienced stable disease and nine (64%) patients achieved clinical benefit. The median progression free survival of the neratinib monotherapy arm was 2.9 months and the median progression free survival of the arm that received neratinib plus temsirolimus was four months. Patients continue to be enrolled in the arm of the trial that is receiving the combination of neratinib plus temsirolimus.

October 13, 2014

Janssen R&D issued results of a phase III study of ZYTIGA (abiraterone acetate) plus prednisone in men with chemotherapynaive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study included 1,088 men with mCRPC who had not received prior chemotherapy and were randomized to receive ZYTIGA (abiraterone acetate) 1,000mg administered orally once daily plus prednisone 5mg twice daily or placebo plus prednisone 5mg twice daily. The study demonstrated a 19% reduction in risk of death in this study population (median OS, 34.7 v. 30.3 months, respectively; HR= 0.81 [95% CI, 0.70-0.93]; p = 0.0033), after a median follow-up of more than four years (49.2 months). 67% of men in the ZYTIGA plus prednisone arm and 80% in the control arm received subsequent therapy. This includes 44% of men in the control arm who subsequently received ZYTIGA plus prednisone. The use of subsequent therapies did not impact the statistical significance between the ZYTIGA and control arms and makes these results all the more compelling after adjusting for the crossover effect. Final analysis demonstrated a significant improvement in median time to opiate use for cancer-related pain compared to placebo plus prednisone (median 33.4 v. 23.4 months, respectively; HR= 0.72 [95% CI, 0.61-0.85]; p = 0.0001). With two additional years (a total of four years) of follow-up since the last clinical cutoff (median 49.2 months), the safety profile of ZYTIGA remained unchanged compared to previous reports. Janssen has initiated regulatory submissions to health authorities for a revision to the ZYTIGA label.

October 6, 2014

Bristol-Myers Squibb released results of a phase III trial of Opdivo (nivolumab) v. investigator’s choice chemotherapy (ICC) in patients with advanced melanoma who were previously treated with Yervoy (ipilimumab). In the randomized, controlled, open-label study (n=370), patients were randomized 2:1 to receive Opdivo 3mg/kg by intravenous infusion every two weeks (n=268) or ICC (dacarbazine 1000mg/m2 every three weeks or carboplatin [AUC] 6 plus paclitaxel 175mg/ m2 every three weeks; n=102) until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The objective response rate (ORR) was 32% (95% CI = 24, 41) in the Opdivo arm and 11% (95% CI = 4, 23) in the ICC reference arm in patients with at least six months of follow up. The majority of Opdivo treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were grade 1/2 and managed using recommended treatment algorithms. Grade 3/4 drug-related AEs were less frequent for the Opdivo arm (9% versus 31% of patients treated chemotherapy). Serious Grade 3/4 drug-related AEs were reported in 5% and 9% of patients treated with Opdivo and ICC, respectively. Discontinuations due to drug-related AEs, of any grade, occurred in 2% of Opdivo-treated patients and 8% of patients administered ICC.

Genentech reported results of a phase III trial of cobimetinib in combination with vemurafenib in previously untreated patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic melanoma harboring a BRAF V600 mutation. The trial was an international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating 60mg once daily of cobimetinib in combination with 960mg twice daily of vemurafenib, compared to 960mg twice daily of vemurafenib alone. In the study, 495 patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive unresectable locally advanced or metastatic melanoma, and previously untreated for advanced disease, were randomized to receive vemurafenib every day on a 28-day cycle plus either cobimetinib or placebo for days 1-21. Median follow up was 7.4 months for the combination arm and 7.2 months for the control arm. The median PFS was 9.9 months for the combination of cobimetinib and vemurafenib v. 6.2 months for vemurafenib alone (hazard ratio [HR]=0.51, 95% CI 0.39-0.68; p<0.0001), demonstrating the combination reduced the risk of the disease worsening by half (49%). The median PFS by independent review committee (IRC), a secondary endpoint, was 11.3 months for the combination arm compared to six months for the control arm (HR=0.60, 95% CI 0.45-0.79; p=0.0003). Objective response rate (ORR) was 68% for the combination v. 45% for vemurafenib alone (p<0.0001). Overall survival data are not yet mature (HR=0.65, 95% CI 0.42-1.00; p=0.046). Roche has submitted an MAA to the EMA, and Genentech plans to submit an NDA to the FDA later this year.

August 25, 2014

Austrianova released results of a phase II study of Cell-in-a-Box combined with ifosfamide for treatment of advanced, inoperable cancer. Thirteen patients with advanced, inoperable pancreatic cancer have been treated with the Cell-in-a-Box/ifosfamide combination in the uncontrolled (no comparator arms), open-label study. A single implantation of Cell-in-Box capsules (each capsule contained approximately 10,000 cells capable of converting the anticancer prodrug ifosfamide into its “cancer-killing” form by virtue of their overexpression of an isoform [CYP2B1] of human cytochrome P450) was used and two courses of treatment with ifosfamide were administered. There were no deleterious effects, such as inflammation or pancreatitis, that could be attributed to the Cell-in-a-Box capsules being implanted in the patients. The median survival of patients in the phase I/II clinical trial was about 40 weeks versus the 33 weeks seen in the phase II clinical trial. The percentage of patients who survived one year was somewhat lower in the phase II clinical trial (23%) than in the phase I/II clinical trial (38%). The dose (1g/ m2) of ifosfamide used in the phase I/II clinical trial was one-third of the “normal” dose of ifosfamide, whereas the dose used in the phase II clinical trial was twice (2g/m2) that dose. A phase IIb trial has been planned in Australia implementing the 1g/m2 dose of ifosfamide instead of the 2g/m2 dose.

August 11, 2014

Amgen and Onyx Pharmaceuticals reported results of a phase III study of Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for injection in combination with Revlimid (lenalidomide) and low-dose dexamethasone (KRd) for multiple myeloma. Patients were randomized to receive Kyprolis (20mg/m on days one and two of cycle one only, then 27mg/m subsequently), in addition to a standard dosing schedule of lenalidomide (25mg per day for 21 days on, seven days off) and low-dose dexamethasone (40mg per week in four week cycles), versus lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone alone. The study randomized 792 patients at sites in North America, Europe and Israel. Patients treated with Kyprolis for injection in combination with Revlimid and low-dose dexamethasone lived significantly longer without their disease worsening (median 26.3 months) compared to patients treated with Revlimid and low-dose dexamethasone (Rd) (median 17.6 months) (HR=0.690, 95% CI, 0.570, 0.834, p<0.0001). Treatment discontinuation due to adverse events and on-study deaths were comparable between the two arms. These results will form the basis for regulatory submissions throughout the world beginning in the first half of 2015.

August 4, 2014

Celsion released result of an ongoing, open-label phase II trial of ThermoDox in recurrent chest wall breast cancer (RCWBC). The trial is designed to enroll 20 patients at several U.S. clinical sites and is evaluating ThermoDox in combination with mild hyperthermia. Of the 13 patients enrolled and treated, 10 were eligible for evaluation of efficacy. To date, 60% of patients experienced a stabilization of their highly refractory disease with a local response rate of 50% observed in the 10 evaluable patients, notably three complete responses, two partial responses and one patient with stable disease.

July 14, 2014

Taiho Oncology issued results of a phase III trial of TAS-102 (trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride) for the treatment of refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. The trial was a global, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison trial. The trial enrolled 800 patients in North America, Japan, Europe and Australia who received at least two prior regimens of standard chemotherapies for mCRC and were refractory to, or failed, those chemotherapies. Patients were randomized (2:1) to receive TAS-102 (35mg/m2) or placebo, plus best supportive care, twice daily. The trial met the primary efficacy endpoint of statistically significant improvement in overall survival versus placebo (H =0.68, p<0.0001). TAS-102 reduced the risk of mortality by 32% when compared to placebo. Median overall survival was 7.1 months (95% CI: 6.5-7.8) and 5.3 months (95% CI: 4.6-6.0) for TAS-102 and placebo, respectively, and was improved in favor of TAS-102 by 1.8 months. There also was a statistically significant 52% decrease in the risk of disease progression between the two arms (HR=0.48, p<0.0001). In addition, the disease control rate of patients treated with TAS-102 was 44.0% versus 16.3% for patients treated with placebo (p<0.0001). Taiho plans to submit regulatory submissions in the U.S. at the end of 2014 and in Europe in the first quarter of 2015.

June 23, 2014

Novartis reported phase I trial results of Zykadia (LDK378) in patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The 246 patients with ALK+ NSCLC in this single-arm study received ceritinib 750mg ALK+ daily. Findings from the study showed patients treated with ceritinib achieved an ORR of 58.5% [95% CI, 52.1-64.8%] and a median PFS of 8.2 months [95% CI, 6.7-10.1 months]. The median duration of response was 9.7 months [95% CI, 7.0-11.4 months], with a median time to first response of six weeks after starting treatment. Among 163 patients receiving 750 mg of ceritinib daily and who were previously treated with the commonly prescribed ALK inhibitor crizotinib, ORR was 54.6% [95% CI, 46.6-62.4%] and PFS was 6.9 months [95% CI, 5.4-8.4 months]. In 83 patients who had not received prior treatment with an ALK inhibitor, ORR was 66.3% [95% CI, 55.1-76.3%] and PFS had not been reached. In the 124 patients who started the study with brain metastases, ceritinib achieved an ORR of 54.0% [95% CI, 44.9-63.0%] and a median PFS of 6.9 months [95% CI, 5.4-8.4 months]. Tumor shrinkage was seen in 50.0% of patients [49 of 98 patients; 95% CI, 39.7-60.3%] with brain metastases who had received previous ALK inhibitor therapy, while 69.2% of patients [18 of 26 patients; 95% CI, 48.2-85.7%] with brain metastases who were not previously treated achieved tumor shrinkage following treatment with ceritinib.

June 2, 2014

Boehringer Ingelheim reported result of two phase III trials (LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6) of afatinib for treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation. The LUX-Lung 3 trial compared afatinib with chemotherapy (pemetrexed/cisplatin); LUX-Lung 6 evaluated afatinib v. chemotherapy (gemcitabine/cisplatin) for Asian patients. Afatinib prolonged survival of lung cancer patients whose tumors have common EGFR mutations compared with standard chemotherapy by a median of three months (27.3 to 24.3 months) and significantly reduced the risk of death by 19% (HR=0.81, p=0.037). The most pronounced reduction in risk of death was 41% (HR=0.59, CI 0.45, 0.77) in patients whose tumors have the most common EGFR mutation (exon 19 deletion of the EGFR gene); for patients with the exon 21 (L8585R) mutation there was no impact on overall survival (HR=1.25, CI 0.92, 1.71). Those patients who continued afatinib treatment, with the addition of chemotherapy, after progressing on afatinib alone, had a further delay in tumor growth compared to the group who stopped afatinib treatment and received chemotherapy only (tumor growth was delayed by 5.6 months and 2.8 months respectively, p=0.003). This corresponded to a 40% reduction in risk of disease progression (HR=0.60). The most common adverse events in patients treated with afatinib and chemotherapy versus chemotherapy were diarrhea (53.8% v. 6.7%), hair loss or alopecia (32.6% v. 15%) and weakness or asthenia (27.3% v. 28.3%).

April 28, 2014

GlaxoSmithKline and Genmab released results of a phase III study of Arzerra (ofatumumab), in combination with chlorambucil for previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Results from the randomized, open-label, parallel-arm, pivotal phase III study evaluating the combination of ofatumumab and chlorambucil (N=221) v. chlorambucil alone (N=226) demonstrated statistically significant improvement in median PFS in patients randomized to ofatumumab and chlorambucil compared to patients randomized to chlorambucil alone (22.4 months v. 13.1 months, respectively) (HR=0.57 [95% CI, 0.45, 0.72] <0.001). The majority of adverse reactions (ARs) were Grade 2 or lower in both treatment arms. The most common (>/=5% in the ofatumumab plus chlorambucil arm and also >/=2% more than in the chlorambucil monotherapy arm) non-infusion-related ARs (all grades) as reported by investigators within 60 days following the last treatment were neutropaenia (27% ofatumumab + chlorambucil, 18% chlorambucil), asthaenia (8%, 5%), headache (7%, 3%), leukopaenia (6%, 2%), herpes simplex (6%, 4%), lower respiratory tract infection (5%, 3%), arthralgia (5%, 3%) and upper abdominal pain (5%, 3%).

April 14, 2014

Synta Pharmaceuticals issued interim results from a single-arm, multi-center, phase II proof-of-concept study designed to evaluate ganetespib for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Target enrollment is 35 patients in three cohorts, which include HER2+ breast cancer, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and, recently added and now recruiting, ER/PR-positive patients previously untreated for locally advanced or metastatic disease. The goal of the trial design is to obtain initial evidence of a clinical activity signal with single-agent ganetespib administered for up to 12 weeks. Ten patients were enrolled into the HER2+ cohort and 38 patients were enrolled into the TNBC cohort. Of the patients evaluable for metabolic response based on having reached the week 3 PET assessment, six of seven achieved a metabolic response in the HER2+ cohort and 18 of 31 achieved a metabolic response in the TNBC cohort. Of the 6 HER2+ and 26 TNBC patients that reached the six-week assessment and therefore evaluable for objective RECIST response, four achieved an objective response and two achieved stable disease in the HER2+ cohort, while two achieved an objective response, 11 achieved stable disease and 13 had progressive disease in the TNBC cohort. One HER2+ patient achieved a complete objective response and has remained on treatment for over 10 months.

April 7, 2014

Novartis released results of a phase I study of LDK378 in 130 patients for the treatment of advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Of 114 ALK+ NSCLC patients treated with LDK378 at 400mg or higher per day, 80 had progressed during or following treatment with crizotinib, and 34 patients with ALK+ NSCLC were crizotinib-naive. The maximum tolerated dose observed in the study was 750mg per day. The median duration of response for the 66 responding patients treated at 400mg or higher per day was 8.2 months [95% CI; 6.9-11.4 months]. In all, 114 ALK+ NSCLC patients treated at 400mg or higher per day, median progression-free survival was 7 months [95% CI; 5.6-9.5 months]. In the 114 ALK+ NSCLC patients treated with LDK378 at 400mg or higher per day, the overall response rate (ORR) was 58% [95% CI; 48-67%] (1 complete response [CR] and 65 partial responses [PR]), which includes those patients who had progressed during or after crizotinib therapy (ORR 56% [95% CI; 45-67%]) and those who were crizotinibnaive (ORR 62% [95% CI; 44-78%]). In the 78 patients with ALK+ NSCLC who received LDK378 at the maximum tolerated dose of 750mg per day, the ORR was 59% [95% CI; 47-70%] (46 PRs), which includes those who had progressed during or after crizotinib therapy (ORR 56% [95% CI; 41-70%]) and those who were crizotinib-naive (ORR 64% [95% CI; 44-81%]). The most frequent adverse events were nausea (82%), diarrhea (75%), vomiting (65%), fatigue (47%) and increased alanine aminotransferase levels (35%). At the 750mg dose level, 50 of 81 patients (62%) required at least one dose reduction, of which 32 occurred in cycle three or later. The FDA has accepted regulatory filings for LDK378.

March 24, 2014

Amgen issued results of a phase III study of talimogene laherparepvec in patients with injectable unresected stage IIIB, IIIC or IV melanoma compared to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Of the 295 patients treated with talimogene laherparepvec, almost 4,000 tumor lesions were tracked. Half of these lesions were injected with talimogene laherparepvec at least once, while the rest were not injected, including visceral tumor lesions. The results showed a 50% or greater reduction in tumor size in 64% of injected tumors. In addition, one-third of uninjected non-visceral tumors, and 15% of visceral tumors, also were reduced by at least 50%. There were 35 melanoma-related surgeries performed during this trial, of which 30% successfully removed all residual disease. The most frequently observed adverse events in the phase III study were fatigue, chills and pyrexia. The most common serious adverse events include disease progression in both groups, and cellulitis and pyrexia in the talimogene laherparepvec group.

March 3, 2014

Eli Lilly reported results of a phase III study of ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy in patients with second-line non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The global, randomized, double-blind trial compared ramucirumab and docetaxel to placebo and docetaxel in NSCLC patients whose disease has progressed after failure of prior platinum-based chemotherapy for locally advanced or metastatic disease. Ramucirumab showed a statistically significant improvement in overall survival in the ramucirumab-plus-docetaxel arm compared to the control arm of placebo plus docetaxel, and a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival in the ramucirumab arm compared to the control arm. The most common (>5% incidence) Grade 3 adverse events on the ramucirumab-plus-docetaxel arm were decreased white blood cell count (neutropenia/leukopenia), febrile neutropenia, fatigue/asthenia and hypertension.

February 17, 2014

Aeterna Zentaris reported results of a phase II trial of zoptarelin doxorubicin (AEZS-108) for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Forty-four patients entered into the study at eight centers in Germany and three centers in Bulgaria. Forty-three of these patients were eligible. Two patients had a complete remission (5%) and eight achieved a partial remission (18%). Stable disease for at least six weeks was observed in 44%. The median time to progression (TTP) was seven months and median overall survival (OS) was 15 months. The most frequently reported grade 3 or 4 adverse effects were neutropenia (12%) and leucopenia (9%). Data showed zoptarelin doxorubicin has clinically meaningful activity with low toxicity in women with advanced or recurrent LHRH receptor positive endometrial cancer, supporting the principle of receptor mediated targeted chemotherapy. These results were the basis of a phase III trial of zoptarelin doxorubicin, currently enrolling.

Eisai reported positive results of a phase III trial of lenvatinib for the treatment of radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III study to compare the PFS of patients with radioiodinerefractory differentiated thyroid cancer and radiographic evidence of disease progression within the prior 12 months, treated with once-daily, oral lenvatinib (24mg) v. placebo. Secondary endpoints of the study included overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS) and safety. The study enrolled 392 patients at over 100 sites in Europe, North and South America and Asia. The preliminary safety analyses showed the five most common adverse reactions were hypertension, diarrhea, decreased appetite, decreased weight and nausea. Based on positive clinical results, Eisai will submit marketing authorization applications for lenvatinib to health authorities in the U.S., Japan and Europe.

Medivation and Astellas Pharma released results of a phase III trial of enzalutamide in patients with chemotherapy- naïve metastatic prostate cancer who have failed androgen deprivation therapy and have few or no symptoms. The trial is a randomized, double-blind, placebocontrolled, multi-national trial that enrolled more than 1,700 patients at sites in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, Russia, Israel and Asian countries including Japan. The trial was designed to evaluate enzalutamide at a dose of 160mg taken orally once daily v. placebo. Treatment with enzalutamide demonstrated a statistically significant overall survival benefit compared with placebo treatment. Enzalutamide reduced the risk of death by 29% (HR=0.71). Treatment with enzalutamide significantly reduced the risk of radiographic progression or death by 81% compared with placebo treatment (HR=0.19). Men taking enzalutamide experienced a 17-month delay in the time to initiation of chemotherapy compared with men taking placebo (28.0 months versus 10.8 months; HR=0.35). Enzalutamide extended the median time to PSA progression from 2.8 months (placebo) to 11.2 months (HR= 0.169). Nearly four out of five patients in the enzalutamide group experienced a PSA decline of 50% or more, compared to less than 4% in the placebo group (78% vs. 3.5%). Regulatory applications to the FDA will be filed in early 2014.

February 10, 2014

Pfizer issued results of a phase II trial of palbociclib for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) locally advanced or newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer. The phase II, multi-center trial, with 101 global sites participating, was designed to assess the PFS of palbociclib (125mg once daily for three out of four weeks in repeated cycles) in combination with letrozole v. letrozole alone (2.5mg once daily on a continuous regimen) in post-menopausal women with ER+, HER2- advanced breast cancer. PFS is comprised of time from randomization to time of disease progression or death from any cause. A randomized, global phase III trial (PALOMA-2) in this patient population is currently enrolling patients.

February 3, 2014

Janssen has issued positive results of a phase II study of siltuximab for the treatment of Multicentric Castleman’s Disease (MCD) in subjects who are HIV-negative and human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8)-negative. The multi-national, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 79 subjects randomized 2:1 to receive either siltuximab plus best supportive care (BSC) or placebo plus BSC until protocol-defined treatment failure, after which patients taking the placebo could cross over to un-blinded siltuximab. Half of the patients on placebo (13 out of 26) crossed over to siltuximab. The study found more than one-third of patients in the siltuximab arm had a durable tumor and symptomatic response to treatment, compared to none of the patients who received placebo plus BSC (34% v. 0%). In looking at the response rate to treat MCD-related symptoms, 25% of patients who received siltuximab plus BSC had durable complete symptom resolution, defined as 100% reduction of baseline overall symptom scores for at least 18 weeks, compared to none of the patients who received placebo plus BSC. These data supported the recent regulatory filings of siltuximab in the U.S. and E.U.

January 6, 2014

Daiichi Sankyo has released results of phase III trials of edoxaban for the treatment of either acute symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or both, in cancer and non-cancer patients. The global, event-driven, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group phase III study involved 8,292 patients in 439 clinical sites across 37 countries. Patients with either a history of cancer (n=563) or with active cancer (n=208) treated with the once-daily factor Xa-inhibitor edoxaban had a numerically lower incidence of recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared to warfarin (3.7% v. 7.1%, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28 to 1.00). Once-daily edoxaban also had a lower incidence of clinically relevant bleeding (major or non-major) compared to warfarin in cancer patients (12.4% v. 18.8%, respectively; HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.92). In the subset of 208 patients with active cancer, once-daily edoxaban had a rate of VTE recurrence of 3.7% compared to 7.1% for warfarin (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.16 to 1.85) and an incidence of clinically relevant bleeding of 18.3% compared to 25.3% for warfarin (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.40 to 1.30).

Takeda Pharmaceutical issued results of a phase III study of VELCADE (bortezomib) for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) in previously untreated patients. Results showed a higher cumulative dose suggests improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.53; p<0.0001). Patients who received a cumulative dose of VELCADE of 39mg/m2 or greater lived 20 months longer on average than those who received lower cumulative doses (median OS 66.3 months and 46.2 months, respectively). Patients (n=340) treated with the VELCADE-melphalan-prednisone regimen received up to nine six-week cycles (up to 54 weeks) of the combination therapy (cycles 1-4: VELCADE 1.3mg/m2 IV, days 1, 4, 8, 11, 22, 25, 29, 32; cycles 5-9: VELCADE 1.3mg/m2 IV, days 1, 8, 22, 29; all cycles: melphalan 9mg/m2 and prednisone 60 mg/m2). The maximum planned dose of VELCADE was 67.6mg/m2, including 41.6mg/m2 during cycles 1-4 and 26mg/m2 during cycles 5-9. The median cumulative VELCADE dose received was 39mg/m2. OS was longer in patients in the higher (=39 mg/m2) v. lower (<39 mg/m2) cumulative dose group (median 66.3 v. 46.2 months; HR 0.53; p<0.0001). The HR for OS between the two groups, adjusted for age differences, that were significant between the two groups, was 0.56 (p=0.0002). A landmark analysis showed that in patients who survived past the 180-day threshold, OS was longer in the higher (=39mg/m2) v. lower (<39mg/m2) cumulative dose group (median 60.4 v. 50.3 months; HR 0.71; p=0.04).

December 9, 2013

Oncolytics Biotech reported results of Reolysin in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with second-line platinum-refractory, taxane-naïve head and neck cancers. The double-blinded, randomized study enrolled 167 patients and showed a median PFS of 94 days in the test arm (n=62), v. 50 days in the control arm (n=56). Patients were evaluated for progression at the first scheduled post-treatment scan (performed at six weeks, post-cycle two of therapy). Of 62 patients on the test arm, 32.3% had progressed, compared with 51.8% of the 56 patients on the control arm (p=0.04). Of 86 patients with measurable disease at the first post-treatment scan, the test arm (n=48) had a statistically significant increase in tumor shrinkage over the control arm (n= 38; p=0.049).

Threshold Pharmaceuticals issued results of a phase I trial of TH-302 in combination with Avastin (bevacizumab) in patients with recurrent glioblastoma following bevacizumab failure. No dose-limiting toxicity has been reported to date at doses of TH-302 up to 670mg/m2 plus bevacizumab at 10mg/m2 every two weeks. A total of 19 patients have been enrolled in the ongoing trial. Of 14 patients evaluable for tumor response, the median time to progression was 86 days. 46% (95% CI: 18%-74%) of patients were alive without disease progression after three months of treatment. Preliminary data in 14 patients showed TH-302 in combination with bevacizumab was associated with a median time to progression of 2.8 months. One patient achieved a complete response and two patients achieved partial responses. No grade 4 adverse events were observed at any dose. Two grade 3 adverse events were observed at 340mg/m2 and 670mg/m2 of skin ulceration and thrombocytopenia, respectively. The study is continuing to enroll patients.

December 2, 2013

Merck issued results for a phase Ib trial of MK-3475 for the treatment of advanced melanoma. The trial is an ongoing, multi-center, single-arm, open-label study evaluating MK-3475 monotherapy in more than 1,000 patients with diverse late-stage cancers (metastatic carcinoma)—predominantly lung and melanoma. Three dosing regimens of MK-3475 were evaluated: 10mg/kg every two weeks, 10mg/kg every three weeks or 2mg/kg every three weeks. The overall response rate at five months was 41% (CI 95%: 32 to 51%); 88% (43/49) of patients with a partial or complete response showed no evidence of disease progression. The maximum ongoing duration of response recorded was 65 weeks (range 8+ to 65+). The disease control rate across doses for patients in the melanoma cohort was 61% (CI 95%: 52 to 70%), and median progressionfree survival at time of analysis was 36 weeks. The company plans to initiate combination trials this year and in early 2014.

November 18, 2013

Angiochem released results of a phase II study of ANG1005 in 80 HER2-positive and HER2-negative breast cancer patients with brain metastases. Two doses, 650mg/m2 (n=13) and 550mg/m2 (n=67), were evaluated for intracranial anti-tumor responses including response rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). ANG1005 adverse events included neutropenia, fatigue, peripheral neuropathy and mucosal inflammation. HER2-positive patients (n=36) achieved PR’s (9, 25%) and stable disease (SD) (18, 50%) thereby demonstrating disease control in 75% of those patients. At 550mg/m2, three month PFS was 71% with a median PFS of 128 days and OS at six months of 82%. Her2-negative patients (n=44) achieved PR’s (5, 11%) and SD (17, 32%), demonstrating disease control in 50% of patients. In addition, at 550mg/m2, three months of PFS was 35% with a median PFS of 84 days and OS at six months of 60%. Angiochem will advance ANG1005 into a phase II clinical study in patients with recurrent high grade gliomas and a phase II clinical study in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with brain metastases.

November 11, 2013

Medivation and Astellas Pharma reported results of a phase III trial of enzalutamide in 1,700 men with metastatic prostate cancer that has progressed despite androgen deprivation therapy and who have not yet received chemotherapy. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational trial enrolled patients at sites in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, Russia, Israel and Asian countries including Japan. The trial was designed to evaluate enzalutamide at a dose of 160mg taken orally once daily v. placebo. Patients treated with enzalutamide demonstrated a statistically significant overall survival advantage compared with patients receiving placebo (p<0.0001). Enzalutamide provided a 30% reduction in risk of death compared with placebo (Hazard Ratio=0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.59- 0.83). Patients treated with enzalutamide demonstrated a statistically significant radiographic progression-free survival advantage compared with placebo (p<0.0001). Enzalutamide provided an 81% reduction in risk of radiographic progression or death compared with placebo (Hazard Ratio=0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.23). The percentage of patients alive in the enzalutamide arm was 72%, as compared with 65% in the placebo arm, at the time of the interim analysis data cut-off date. Treatment with enzalutamide resulted in a calculated point estimate for median overall survival of 32.4 months (95% confidence interval, 31.5 months-upper limit not yet reached) v. 30.2 months (95% confidence interval, 28.0 months-upper limit not yet reached) for patients receiving placebo. Medivation and Astellas will initiate meetings with and submissions to regulatory agencies beginning in early 2014.

October 28, 2013

Acacia Pharma issued results from a phase II study of APD515 for the treatment of xerostomia (dry mouth) in advanced cancer patients. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial was conducted in 11 centers in the U.K. and Denmark, and enrolled 32 patients with advanced cancer and a persistently dry mouth. Patients received a week of APD515 treatment and a week of placebo, in a randomly assigned order, with a week’s washout in between. Patients graded their symptoms before and after treatment and were asked to record which treatment week they preferred. Patients’ unstimulated salivary flow was measured before and after each treatment period. Subjective scoring was done on a standard 100mm visual analogue scale, where 0 represented no dryness and 100 the worst dryness possible. The average score for mouth dryness was 26.01 after treatment with APD515 and 43.52 after placebo (p=0.0005). Other subjective scores, for oral comfort, difficulty speaking and difficulty swallowing, all showed a significant improvement for APD515 over placebo. The overall number of adverse events was low, with no significant difference between APD515 and placebo.

September 9, 2013

Incyte issued results of a phase II trial of ruxolitinib, its oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, in combination with capecitabine in patients with recurrent or treatment refractory metastatic pancreatic cancer. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled 136 patients. The hazard ratio (HR) for overall survival (OS) in the intent to treat population was 0.79 (one-sided p=0.12), and in a pre-specified subgroup analysis conducted in patients identified prospectively as most likely to benefit from JAK pathway inhibition, the HR for OS was 0.47 (one-sided p=0.005). Within this subgroup of patients, which represented 50% of the randomized population, six-month survival in the ruxolitinib arm was 42% v. 11% for placebo. Durable tumor responses were observed only in patients receiving ruxolitinib, and ruxolitinib-treated patients achieved a significant improvement in body weight relative to placebo. A phase III trial will be reviewed with the FDA.

August 19, 2013

Boehringer Ingelheim issued results of a phase III study of afatinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data from the LUX-Lung 3 trial demonstrate superiority of afatinib over chemotherapy considered best-in-class (pemetrexed/cisplatin) in EGFR-mutation positive advanced NSCLC patients. Patients treated with afatinib lived for almost one year (progression-free survival (PFS) of 11.1 months) before their tumor started to grow again compared to just over half a year (PFS of 6.9 months) for those treated with chemotherapy. Patients taking afatinib with the most common EGFR mutations (del19 and L858R, accounting for 90% of all EGFR mutations) lived for well over a year without progression (PFS of 13.6 months) v. just over half a year (PFS of 6.9 months) for those in the comparator arm. Afatinib significantly delayed the time to deterioration for cough (hazard ratio [HR], 0.60; P=0.007) and dyspnoea (HR, 0.68; P=0.015) and showed significantly better mean scores over time in global health status/QoL (P=0 .015) and physical (P<0.001), role (P=0.004) and cognitive (P=0.007) functioning compared with chemotherapy, as measured by standard questionnaires. The LUX-Lung clinical trial program currently involves eight studies designed to investigate the use of afatinib in various settings of advanced NSCLC, including head-to-head trials with the first-wave of reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

August 12, 2013

GlaxoSmithKline issued results of a randomized, double-blind, phase III, placebo controlled trial of pazopanib monotherapy in women with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer whose disease had not progressed after completing standard debulking surgery and first-line chemotherapy. After completion of five or more cycles of platinum-taxane chemotherapy, 940 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive 800mg pazopanib once daily or placebo for up to 24 months (median time from diagnosis to randomization was approximately seven months). Pazopanib treatment reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 23% (HR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.64-0.91; p = 0.0021). The incidence of serious adverse events was higher in the pazopanib group compared to the placebo group (26% v. 11%). Regulatory applications will be submitted before 2014.

Immunomedics reported results of a phase Ib study of 90Y-labeled-clivatuzumab for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer in 58 patients who had received at least two prior treatments. Patients were randomized to receive either 90Y-labeled-clivatuzumab once a week for three weeks at 6.5mCi/m2 with gemcitabine 200mg/m2 given weekly for four weeks (Arm A) or 90Y-labeled-clivatuzumab alone (Arm B). This treatment cycle was repeated every four weeks until unacceptable toxicity, patient deterioration or patient withdrawal. Patients were followed for one year or until death. The median overall survival (OS) for Arm A (N=27) was 119 days, an improvement over Arm B (N=26), with a median OS of 80 days (P=0.04). For the 23 patients who received multiple cycles of therapy, the median OS increased to 157 days in Arm A compared with 103 days in Arm B. Survival also was related to patients’ Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) scores at study entry, increasing from a median of 79 days for patients with 80% KPS to 119 days for patients with 90% to 100% KPS. In contrast, increased number of prior treatments is a negative prognostic indicator for survival. The median OS decreased from 90 to 82 to 73 days for patients who received 2, 3 or 4 to 5 prior treatments, respectively. Phase III trials are planned for 2013 or the beginning of 2014 in the U.S. and the E.U.

July 29, 2013

Amgen released results from a phase II study of XGEVA (denosumab) in adults and skeletally mature adolescents diagnosed with giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). In the international, open-label, phase II study enrolling 282 patients, there were three cohorts: patients with surgically unsalvageable GCTB (Cohort 1), patients with salvageable GCTB whose surgery was associated with severe morbidity (Cohort 2) and patients who transferred from a previous XGEVA GCTB study (Cohort 3). All three cohorts received subcutaneous XGEVA 120mg every four weeks with loading doses on days eight and 15. In Cohort 1, 96% (163/169) of patients had no disease progression after a median follow-up of 13 months. In Cohort 2, 74% (74/100) of patients required no surgery and 62% (16/26) of patients who had surgery underwent a less morbid procedure than planned. XGEVA was approved June 13 by the FDA for the treatment of adults and skeletally mature adolescents with GCTB that is unresectable or where surgical resection is likely to result in severe morbidity.

Bayer HealthCare issued results from a phase III study of Xofigo in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients with symptomatic bone metastases. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international study enrolled 921 patients in 100 centers in 19 countries. Patients were stratified based on their baseline alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level, current bisphosphonate use and whether or not they had received docetaxel prior to enrollment. Treatment consisted of up to six intravenous injections separated by four weeks. Xofigo improved overall survival (OS) at the prespecified interim analysis (HR=0.695, [95% CI: 0.552-0.875], p=0.00185); median OS was 14.0 months with Xofigo (95% CI: 12.1-15.8) vs. 11.2 months with placebo (95% CI: 9.0-13.2). These findings were supported by an exploratory analysis performed before patient crossover with an additional 214 events in which Xofigo showed improvement in OS (HR=0.695, [95% CI: 0.581-0.832]); median OS was 14.9 months in the Xofigo arm (95% CI: 13.9-16.1) v. 11.3 months in the placebo arm (95% CI: 10.4-12.8). These data supported the FDA approval of Xofigo injection in May.

July 1, 2013

Amgen reported results from a phase III trial of trebananib plus paclitaxel v. placebo plus paclitaxel for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. This global, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolled 900 women with recurrent partially platinum-sensitive or -resistant (platinum-free interval of 12 months or less) epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal or fallopian tube cancer. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either 15mg/kg of intravenous trebananib weekly plus 80mg/m of intravenous paclitaxel weekly (three weeks on, one week off) or weekly intravenous placebo plus 80mg/m of intravenous paclitaxel weekly (three weeks on, one week off). The trial met its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS). A statistically significant difference was observed in PFS with a 34% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death (HR = 0.66, 95% CI, 0.57, 0.77, p<0.001). The median PFS was 7.2 months in the trebananib arm v. 5.4 months in the control arm.

June 24, 2013

Novartis reported results from a phase I trial of LDK378 for anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who had progressed during or after crizotinib therapy or had not been previously treated with crizotinib. This single-arm study enrolled 114 patients. The results showed an overall response rate of 60% in patients with ALK+ NSCLC taking LDK378 (750 mg/day), which includes patients who had progressed during or after crizotinib therapy (overall response rate of 59%) and those who were crizotinib-naive (overall response rate of 62%). 78 patients were treated at 750mg/day; 36 patients were treated with LDK378 at 400-750mg/day. The median duration of response for patients treated at 400mg/day or higher (n=66) was 8.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9-NE), with a median progression-free survival of 8.6 months (95% CI; 5.7-9.9). The six-month duration of response rate at 750mg/day was 61% (95% CI; 34.9-78.8). This trial will serve as the basis for the first regulatory filing, anticipated in early 2014.

June 17, 2013

DelMar Pharmaceuticals reported results from a phase I/II trial of VAL-083 (dianhydrogalactitol) for the treatment of recurrent malignant glioma and progressive secondary brain tumors. Of the three cohorts of patients currently enrolled, all have failed standard therapies and have no viable treatment options. The subjects received VAL-083 at a dose of 1.5mg/m; 3.0mg/m and 5.0mg/m. At these doses, 25% (2/8) of GBM patients and 17% (1/6) of secondary-progressive brain cancer patients showed stable disease or tumor regression in response to treatment. VAL-083 therapy is well tolerated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and secondary-progressive brain tumor patients with no drug-related serious adverse events at doses studied to date. DelMar plans to split the protocol into two separate studies: one focusing solely on refractory glioblastoma and the other focusing on metastatic brain cancers.

Halozyme Therapeutics reported results from a phase Ib trial of PEGPH20 (PEGylated Recombinant Human Hyaluronidase) for the treatment of stage IV metastatic pancreatic cancer. The single-arm phase Ib trial enrolled 28 stage IV treatment naïve pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. The overall response rate (complete response + partial response) by RECIST 1.1 criteria was 42% (95% CI 22-62) for those treated at therapeutic dose levels of PEGPH20 (1.6 and 3.0μg/kg) as assessed by an independent radiology review (n=24). Additionally, in subjects with high levels of hyaluronan (HA), a substance found in a protective matrix that surrounds many pancreatic cancers, the overall response rate was 64% (seven of 11 subjects with available biopsy). Moreover, 43% (six of 14 subjects) saw a reduction of at least 70% in serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), a biomarker that often correlates with tumor cell burden. Treatment was generally well tolerated, and the adverse event profile was consistent with those seen in previous studies of PEGPH20 as a single agent and as previously reported for gemcitabine alone. The most common adverse events were muscle spasms, myalgia and arthralgia (all grade 1/2). There was no evidence of new toxicities when used in combination with gemcitabine. The results support the dosing regimen at 3μg/kg, being used in the phase II trial.

June 10, 2013

Boehringer Ingelheim issued results from a phase III trial of LUME-Lung 1 for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This randomized, openlabel, double-blind study enrolled 1,314 patients with locally advanced or metastatic (stage IIIb/IV or recurring) NSCLC after first-line therapy. The subjects received nintedanib 200mg BID plus docetaxel 75mg/m(2) once a day for three weeks (n=655), or docetaxel plus placebo (n=659). LUME-Lung 1 improved progression-free survival (PFS)—the primary endpoint—as a second-line treatment in patients with NSCLC compared to docetaxel alone. Secondary endpoints included overall survival. Results showed patients treated with nintedanib plus docetaxel lived for a median of 3.4 months before their tumor started to grow again, versus 2.7 months with docetaxel alone (HR 0.79; p=0.0019). The most common adverse events (AEs) of any grade in the nintedanib combination and docetaxel alone groups were diarrhea (42.3% v. 21.8%, respectively) and ALT elevations (28.5% v. 8.4%, respectively). Incidence of > grade 3 AEs was 71.3% in patients treated with nintedanib plus docetaxel compared to 64.3% with docetaxel alone. A higher incidence of > grade 3 diarrhea and elevated ALT were observed in patients treated with nintedanib plus docetaxel compared to docetaxel alone (> grade 3 diarrhea: 6.6% v. 2.6%; elevated ALT: 7.8% v. 0.9%). Incidence of > grade 3 hypertension, bleeding and thrombosis were similar in both treatment arms. There was a 1% difference in discontinuation between the treatment arms, with 22.7% of patients stopping treatment with nintedanib plus docetaxel versus 21.7% with docetaxel alone.

Novartis reported results from a phase III trial of Afinitor for the treatment of HER2 positive advanced breast cancer. This randomized, double-blind study of everolimus plus trastuzumab and vinorelbine conducted at 159 clinical trial sites globally included 569 women with HER2 positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who were previously treated with a taxane and were resistant to trastuzumab. Subjects received either everolimus 5mg/day orally or placebo, plus weekly vinorelbine 25mg/m IV and weekly trastuzumab 2mg/kg IV following a loading dose of 4mg/kg. The primary endpoint of significantly extended progression-free survival (PFS) when compared to treatment with placebo plus trastuzumab and vinorelbine was met. Final PFS results showed adding everolimus to the standard treatment of trastuzumab and vinorelbine reduced the risk of disease progression by 22% (hazard ratio=0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI):0.65 to 0.95]; p<0.01). Median time to progression was 7.0 months in the everolimus combination arm and 5.8 months in the placebo combination arm. Adverse events were consistent with the known safety profile of everolimus. The most common all-grade adverse reactions (incidence >30%) were neutropenia, stomatitis, anemia, leukopenia, fatigue, pyrexia, diarrhea, nausea, decreased appetite and constipation.

May 20, 2013

Syndax Pharmaceuticals published results from a phase II trial of entinostat for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, ENCORE 301, enrolled 130 postmenopausal women with ER+ breast cancer whose cancer had progressed after treatment with a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. Subjects received 25mg exemestane daily plus 5mg entinostat once per week, or 25mg exemestane plus placebo. Based on intent-to-treat analysis, patients treated with entinostat saw improved median progression-free survival to 4.3 months versus 2.3 months in patients treated with placebo (hazard ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.07; one-sided p=.055; two-sided p=.11). Overall survival was an exploratory endpoint, and median survival improved to 28.1 months in entinostat-treated patients versus 19.8 months in placebo-treated (hazard ratio 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.97; p=.036). Entinostat was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were fatigue and neutropenia. Based on this data, Syndax Pharmaceuticals is working to move entinostat into a confirmatory pivotal study this fall.

April 22, 2013

Activartis reported preliminary results from a phase II trial of AV0113 for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled study had enrolled 100 subjects with GBM at the time of analysis. Subjects received standard first-line therapy, plus AV0113 DC-CIT inoculated into inguinal lymph nodes: after six weeks of chemo and radiotherapy, four weekly applications; six more applications every four weeks; and then one boost immunization every three months. Preliminary results revealed a very promising trend suggesting an overall survival benefit of patients in the AV0113 treatment group compared to the randomized control group. At 12 months, 64% of patients in the treatment group and 48% of patients in the control group were still alive. At 18 months, 50% of patients in the treatment and 33% of patients in the control group were still alive. Patients receiving AV0113 cancer immunotherapy tended to experience signs of relapse earlier compared to control patients. AV0113-triggered inflammation in the tumor tissue may explain this observation, which was also made in other clinical trials studying cancer immunotherapy. AV0113 treatment was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were local swelling, redness and tenderness at the injection site. Activartis will continue the phase II trial to confirm the observed trend.

April 15, 2013

Navidea Biopharmaceuticals issued interim results from a phase III trial of Lymphoseek (technetium 99m tilmanocept) for identifying sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This open-label, multicenter, within-patient study, NEO3-06, enrolled 80 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. After receiving a Lymphoseek injection, 39 of the 80 patients were determined to have pathology-positive lymph nodes. Results demonstrated of these 39 patients, Lymphoseek accurately identified 38, for an overall False Negative Rate (FNR) of 2.56%, which was statistically significant (p=0.0205) and met the statistical threshold for success of the primary endpoint. Moreover, multiple-level nodal dissection of patients in the trial with cancer-positive lymph nodes led to an average removal of 38 lymph nodes per patient, whereas Lymphoseek on average led to the removal of approximately four lymph nodes, representing a substantial reduction in potential morbidity for patients with head and neck cancer undergoing sentinel lymph node biopsy. Based on these data, Navidea Biopharmaceuticals will evaluate the possibility of filing a Supplemental New Drug application (sNDA) later this year.

February 4, 2013

Amgen issued results from a phase III trial of Neulasta (pegfilgrastim) for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled 845 patients receiving FOLFOX or FOLFIRI and bevacizumab for the first-line treatment of locally-advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. Subjects received 6mg of Neulasta, or placebo, at least 24 hours after each cycle of chemotherapy. Results showed the study met its primary endpoint: Neulasta significantly reduced the incidence of febrile neutropenia (low white blood cell count accompanied by a fever). In the study, the incidence of grade 3 or 4 febrile neutropenia in patients receiving Neulasta across the first four cycles of chemotherapy was 2.4%, compared to 5.7% in the placebo group (OR=0.41, p=0.014). A similar incidence of grade 3 or higher adverse events was seen in both arms of the trial (28% placebo; 27% Neulasta). The drug was well tolerated. Amgen did not note its plans for Neulasta.

January 28, 2013

Celgene International issued results from a phase III trial of Abraxane in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. This open-label, randomized, international study, MPACT, enrolled 861 treatment-naïve patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Subjects received 125mg/m2 Abraxane plus 1000mg/m2 gemcitabine for three weeks, followed by a week of rest, or 1000mg/m2 gemcitabine alone for seven weeks, followed by a week of rest. Data demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival in the Abraxane/gemcitabine arm compared to patients receiving gemcitabine alone (median of 8.5 vs. 6.7 months) (HR 0.72, p=0.000015). Results showed the Abraxane/gemcitabine arm demonstrated a 59% increase in one-year survival (35% versus 22%, p=0.0002) and demonstrated double the rate of survival at two years (9% versus 4%, p=0.02) as compared to gemcitabine alone. Furthermore, the Abraxane/gemcitabine arm demonstrated a 31% reduction in the risk of progression or death with a median progression-free survival of 5.5 versus 3.7 months (HR 0.69, P=0.000024) and an overall response rate of 23% compared to 7%. The drug was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia, fatigue and neuropathy. Based on these results, Celgene International plans to submit dossiers for registration in the U.S. and Europe during the first half of 2013, followed by submissions in other countries/regions during the second half of 2013.

January 7, 2013

Bristol-Myers Squibb reported results from a phase II trial of elotuzumab in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone for the treatment of multiple myeloma. This randomized, multi-center, open-label study enrolled patients with previously treated multiple myeloma. Subjects received either 10mg/kg or 20mg/kg of elotuzumab intravenously on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of a 28-day cycle in the first two cycles, and then on days 1 and 15 of subsequent cycles. Subjects also received lenalidomide 25mg PO daily on days 1 to 21 and dexamethasone 40mg PO weekly. Results demonstrated in the 10mg/kg arm, median progression-free survival (PFS) was not reached after 20.8 months of follow up (n=36) and the objective response rate (ORR; according to the International Myeloma Working Group response criteria) was 92%. Of patients who received elotuzumab at a dose of 20mg/kg, median PFS was 18.6 months (n=37) and ORR was 76%. Elotuzumab was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were lymphopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, leukopenia, hyperglycemia, pneumonia, diarrhea, fatigue and hypokalemia. BMS also is studying elotuzumab in two phase III trials for treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

December 10, 2012

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals released results from a phase I trial of ponatinib for the treatment of resistant and refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL). This dose-escalation study enrolled 81 patients with resistant hematologic cancers, including 60 patients with CML and five patients with Ph+ ALL, who had become resistant to one or more tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Results showed that after 73 weeks, 72% of patients (31 of 43) with chronic-phase CML had a major cytogenetic response (MCyR), including 92% (11 of 12) who had the T315I gatekeeper mutation, the most common mutation among resistant patients. In addition, of 22 patients with accelerated-phase or blast-phase CML or Ph+ ALL, 36% (8 of 22) had a major hematologic response and 32% (7 of 22) had aMCyR. The drug was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were rash, thrombocytopenia, arthralgia, increased lipase, fatigue, acneiform dermatitis dry skin and nausea. ARIAD did not disclose its plans for ponatinib.

November 28, 2012

Aeterna Zentaris reported results from a phase I trial of perifosine combined with temsirolimus for the treatment of malignant glioma. This combination, dose-ranging study enrolled 32 patients with recurrent or progressive malignant glioma, anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma and transformed low-grade gliomas with median Karnofsky Performance Status 80. Subjects either received a 600mg or 900mg dose of perifosine on day one, followed by a nightly dose of 100mg of perifosine. All subjects also received 15mg to170mg of temsirolimus once weekly. Preliminary survival results demonstrated that median overall survival was 7.4 months. There were 27 radiographic responses: complete response (0), partial response (2), stable disease (13) and progressive disease (12). The most frequent adverse events were hypophosphatemia, hypocholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. The maximum tolerated dose was not defined, so Aeterna Zentaris is creating expansion cohorts.

OncoSec Medical issued preliminary results from a phase II trial of ImmunoPulse for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This single-arm, open-label and multi-center study has enrolled 13 patients with stage III or IV cutaneous and in-transit metastatic melanoma, of 25 patients expected. Subjects received a maximum dose of 1.5mg of DNA IL-12 via ImmunoPulse on days one, five and eight, applied to up to four lesions. Subjects also received electroporation treatment. Results suggested that ImmunoPulse is able to induce regression or stabilization of distant untreated metastases following a single cycle of treatment. Ninety-five percent of treated lesions demonstrated response at day 39 (5% progressive disease, 14% stable disease (SD), 42% partial response (PR), 39% complete response (CR)). All treated lesions at day 90 (5% SD, 50% PR, 45% CR), and at day 180 (33% PR, 67% CR) demonstrated a response. At day 180, two subjects were evaluable for the primary endpoint of objective overall response (ORR). One patient has a confirmed stable disease, and the second patient has a confirmed complete response of all treated and untreated lesions. ImmunoPulse and DNA IL-12 were well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were generally limited to transient pain related to electroporation treatment. OncoSec Medical will continue the phase II study, which it expects to be completed by the end of 2012.

November 12, 2012

MorphoSys and Xencor released results from a phase I/IIa trial of MOR208 (MOR00208/XmAb5574) for the treatment of tumor activity. This dose-ranging study enrolled patients with high-risk, heavily pretreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). Subjects received doses ranging from MOR208 0.3mg/kg to 12mg/kg as an intravenous infusion on days 1, 4, 8, 15 and 22 in cycle one, and on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 in cycle two. Overall response rate by International Working Group on CLL (IWCLL) 2008 criteria was 11%, which utilizes more rigorous CT scan reduction of internal lymph nodes not previously required in older historic studies. Using IWCLL 1996 response criteria resulted in a response rate of 42%. MORE208 was well tolerated and found safe. The most frequent adverse events were mild to moderate infusion reactions usually with the first dose. Based on these results, MorphoSys plans to commence phase II studies of MOR208 in B-cell malignancies in the near future.

October 29, 2012

Celgene International reported results from a phase III trial of pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone compared to high-dose dexamethasone for multiple myeloma. This multi-center, randomized, open-label study enrolled patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. Subjects in Arm 1 received 4mg pomalidomide on days 1-21 of each 28-day cycle, with patients 75 years or younger also receiving 40mg of low-dose dexamethasone and patients older than 75 receiving 20mg of low-dose dexamethasone on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of each 28-day cycle, until disease progression. Subjects in Arm 2 received 40mg high-dose dexamethasone on days 1-4, 9-12 and 17-20 of each 28-day cycle if they were 75 years or younger, and patients older than 75 received 20mg high-dose dexamethasone on days 1-4, 9-12 and 17-20 of a 28-day cycle, until disease progression. The study met its primary endpoint of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) at the PFS final analysis. Additionally, the study crossed the superiority boundary for overall survival (OS), a key secondary endpoint. As a result, patients who had not yet progressed in the high-dose dexamethasone arm should be crossed-over to the pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone arm. Celgene has submitted an NDA application to the FDA, as well as an MAA application to the EMA.

October 15, 2012

Boehringer Ingelheim released results from a phase III trial of afatinib for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This randomized, open-label study enrolled 345 previously untreated patients with EGFR mutation positive NSCLC. Subjects received afatinib or standard chemotherapy agents (pemetrexed/cisplatin) as first-line treatment. Data showed afatinib-dosed patients had a progression-free survival (PFS) of 11.1 months versus a PFS of 6.9 months for those receiving pemetrexed/cisplatin. NSCLC patients with tumors harboring the two most common EGFR mutations (del19 and L858R) receiving afatinib had a PFS of 13.6 months versus a PFS of 6.9 months for those in the comparator arm. The afatinib-dosed arm experienced an improvement in shortness of breath, cough and chest pain, a delay in deterioration of these symptoms, and overall improved quality of life. Afatinib was well tolerated. Boehringer Ingelheim has initiated two head-to-head trials comparing afatinib to Iressa (gefitinib) and Tarceva (erlotinib), to demonstrate any potential efficacy and safety superiority.

September 17, 2012

ImmunoGen released results from a phase II trial of IMGN901, in combination with etoposide and carboplatin, for the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). This randomized, dose-finding study, NORTH, enrolled 120 patients. Subjects received etoposide 100 mg/m2 on days one through three every 21 days; carboplatin AUC5 or AUC6 on day one every 21 days; and IMGN901 ranging up to 112 mg/m2, administered on days one and eight every 21 days. Results showed that IMGN901 112 mg/m2, carboplatin AUC5 and etoposide 100 mg/m2 was the most effective dose. Of the 33 patients dosed with this regimen, 10 had an objective response and 24 (72.7%) had disease control (objective response or stable disease). IMGN901 was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse event was low grade peripheral neuropathy.

August 27, 2012

Medivation and Astellas Pharma published results from a phase III trial of enzalutamide for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. This international, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, AFFIRM, enrolled 1,199 men who had been previously treated with docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Subjects received enzalutamide 160mg once daily (as four 40mg capsules), or placebo. Data showed enzalutamide exhibited a statistically significant benefit in overall survival compared to placebo. Men treated with enzalutamide had a median overall survival of 18.4 months (95% confidence interval, 17.3 to not yet reached) compared to 13.6 months (95% confidence interval 11.3-15.8) for men treated with placebo (hazard ratio 0.63; p<0.0001), representing a 37% reduction in the risk of death. The drug was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were fatigue, diarrhea and hot flush. Seizure was reported in less than 1% of enzalutamide-treated patients. Neither Medivation nor Astellas noted its next steps for enzalutamide.

July 9, 2012

Synta Pharmaceuticals reported interim results from a phase IIb/III trial of ganetespib in combination with docetaxel for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This multi-arm, randomized, open-label phase IIb part of the GALAXY study enrolled 183 patients to date with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC who have progressed following one prior line of therapy. All subjects received a standard regimen of docetaxel 75mg/m2 on Day 1 of a 21-day cycle; subjects in the combination arm receive in addition ganetespib 150mg/m2 on Day 1 and 15. Both primary endpoints were met based on RECIST 1.1 criteria. Subjects with elevated baseline level of serum LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) who received a combination of ganetespib and docetaxel had a median PFS of 4.2 months, compared to 1.4 months in those treated with only docetaxel; subjects with a tumor KRAS mutation receiving the combination treatment had a median PFS of 4.2 months, while the docetaxel group had a PFS of 1.6 months. The treatment was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia, diarrhea and fatigue. Synta Pharmaceuticals will continue to enroll more subjects in the phase IIb trial. The transition into phase III is expected later this year.

June 11, 2012

Bayer Healthcare and Onyx Pharmaceuticals released results from a phase III trial of regorafenib for the treatment of metastatic and/or unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center, cross-over study, GRID, enrolled 199 patients who had been treated unsuccessfully with imatinib and sunitinib. Subjects received either 160mg regorafenib daily for three weeks followed by a week off plus best supportive care or placebo plus best supportive care. The GRID study met its primary endpoint of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) (HR≡0.27, p<0.0001). The median PFS was 4.8 months in the regorafenib arm versus 0.9 months in the placebo arm. The most common adverse events included hand-foot skin reaction, hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue, oral mucositis, alopecia, hoarsness and anorexia, among others. Based on these data, Bayer plans to submit an NDA in the second half of 2012.

December 12, 2011

Acacia Pharma issued results from a phase IIa trial of APD209 for cancer cachexia. The trial enrolled 13 subjects with an average weight loss of 11.4% in the previous six months. The subjects received APD209 for eight weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was major response, defined as an increase in quadriceps muscle size of at least 4% and/or an increase of at least 10% in quadriceps strength. Seven subjects completed the eight week course of treatment, with six achieving a major response. Among the responders, the average increase in quadriceps volume was 6% and quadriceps strength rose on average 16%. Hand grip strength increased on average 17%. Physical activity was also markedly improved in three subjects. In two of these subjects the average daily step count more than doubled between the start and end of treatment. Side effects related to APD209 were generally mild.

April 13, 2009

Oncolytics issued positive results from a phase II trial of Reolysin with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of advanced cancers. This open-label, single-arm, multi-center study, dubbed REO-008, enrolled 16 subjects in the UK. All subjects had advanced or metastatic cancers that are refractory to standard therapy. The subjects receive two intratumoral doses of Reolysin at 1x10(10) TCID(50) with a constant localized radiation dose of 20 Gy in five consecutive daily fractions. The primary endpoint was objective tumor response rate in treated lesions. Secondary endpoints were to evaluate viral replication, immune response, and safety. Of the 16 enrolled subjects, 14 were evaluable for response. Thirteen subjects had stable disease or better in the treated target lesions. Of these, partial responses were observed in four and minor responses were observed in two subjects, for a total disease control rate (stable disease + partial response + complete response) of 93% in the treated lesions. The combination was well tolerated.

March 30, 2009

Oncolytics Biotech issued positive interim results from a phase I/II trial (REO-011) of Reolysin for the treatment of advanced cancer. All subjects had cancer refractory to standard therapy or for which no curative standard therapy exists. The phase I portion of this trial was designed as an open-label, non-randomized study. The subjects received escalating doses of intravenous Reolysin with standard doses of paclitaxel and carboplatin every three weeks. The phase II portion of this trial was a single arm, open-label, dose-targeted, non-randomized design. Fourteen subjects were enrolled and received the determined maximum tolerated dose of Reolysin given intravenously in combination with a standard dosage of paclitaxel and carboplatin. Data is from 15 subjects with head and neck cancer; all but one had prior platinum treatment. Of 12 subjects evaluable for clinical response, 5 had partial response and four had stable disease ranging from two to six months. For the subjects who have been followed for at least six months since their initial treatment, the median progression-free survival is currently six months, while the overall survival is currently seven months.

November 26, 2007

Thallion reported positive results from a phase I/II trial of ECO-4601 for the treatment of advanced cancers. The trial enrolled twenty-six subjects who were refractory to their respective standard of care therapy. ECO-4601 was administered in twenty-one day cycles consisting of a two week continuous intravenous infusion followed by a one week rest period. The trial was conducted in two portions. In the first portion, fourteen subjects received escalating doses ranging from 30 to 480mg/m2/day to assess safety, pharmacokinetics and maximum tolerated dose. In the second portion of the trial, twelve subjects were treated at the highest dose, 480mg/m2/day. Treatment was well tolerated and the maximum target dose was attained before the maximum tolerated dose was reached. Pharmacokinetic data demonstrated that estimated therapeutic plasma concentrations of ECO-4601 were reached at the higher doses and that ECO-4601 was rapidly eliminated from the bloodstream following infusion. In addition, six of seven subjects with refractory cancer who had completed six cycles of treatment achieved stable disease. Based on the results, phase II trials were expected to be initiated in early 2008.

October 29, 2007

Cephalon reported positive results from a phase III trial of Treanda for the treatment of non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL). This multicenter, single-arm study, conducted under a SPA from the FDA, enrolled 100 subjects with relapsed, rituximab-refractory NHL who were no longer responsive to treatment with rituximab. The primary endpoints, overall response rate and median duration of response, were both achieved. The overall response rate, including complete, unconfirmed complete or partial response, was reached by 75% (p<0.0001) and the median duration of response was 40 weeks (9.2 months). Treatment was determined to be safe and well tolerated. Based on the results, Cephalon plans to file a sNDA with the FDA in Q4 of 2007.

EntreMed issued positive results from a phase II trial of Panzem for the treatment of ovarian cancer. This open label trial enrolled 18 women with platinum refractory epithelial ovarian cancer who received Panzem administered as a single agent. One subject had confirmed partial response of their CA- 125, a tumor bio-marker. Five of the eighteen subjects achieved stable disease lasting greater than three months. Treatment was well tolerated, with no reports of significant neuropathy, myelosuppression or thromboembolic side effects. Two subjects remain in the study at this time. Based on the results, EntreMed plans to advance the development of Panzem for this indication.

Exelixis released positive results from an ongoing phase I trial of XL184 for the treatment of solid tumors. To date, this open-label, dose-finding trial had enrolled 33 subjects with unresectable or malignant advanced solid malignancy or lymphoma in whom alternative therapy does not exist or is ineffective. The subjects received two cycles of XL184, administered as a daily oral dose for 5 consecutive days with a 9-day observation period (0.08-11.52 mg/kg), or dosed daily (175 and 265 mg). Of seven subjects with thyroid cancer, 3 had partial responses, 6 had tumor shrinkage and 1 had non-measurable disease. All seven subjects experienced a rapid decrease in plasma levels of calcitonin and six had a decrease in the tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen. In addition, one subject with a neuroendocrine tumor had an unconfirmed partial response. Fifteen subjects with various solid malignancies or lymphoma have had stable disease lasting from three months to up to 20 months, including nine with stable disease for more than six months. Preliminary pharmacokinetic analyses of nine dose levels (0.08-11.52 mg/kg) indicate a long half-life of 59 to 136 hours. Treatment has been well tolerated and dose escalation is continuing to determine the maximum tolerated dose. Based on positive results, Exelixis plans to commence phase II trials by the end of 2007.

Human Genome Sciences reported positive results from a phase Ib trial of lexatumumab for the treatment of cancer. This open-label, dose-escalation study enrolled 41 subjects with a variety of solid malignancies. The subjects received HGS-ETR2 (5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg) administered intravenously, plus a full-dose regimen of chemotherapy (gemcitabine, pemetrexed, doxorubicin or FOLFIRI). Objective responses were reported for two subjects; one with colorectal cancer in the FOLFIRI arm and one with small-cell lung cancer in the doxorubicin arm. Stable disease was observed in 22 of the subjects. The pharmacokinetics of lexatumumab were not affected by the chemotherapeutic agents, nor were the pharmacokinetics of the chemotherapeutic agents affected by lexatumumab. Treatment was determined to be safe and well tolerated. Based on the results, the company plans to advance the development of lexatumumab.

October 15, 2007

Adventrx issued negative results from a phase IIb trial of CoFactor for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This open-label, randomized, controlled study enrolled 300 subjects who received CoFactor/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or leucovorin/5- FU. The primary endpoint was a reduction in the proportion of subjects reporting at least one hematological or gastrointestinal adverse event of grade 3 or greater. The CoFactor/5-FU arm demonstrated comparable overall safety to the leucovorin/5-FU arm. However, the CoFactor/5-FU arm did not demonstrate statistically significant improved safety in the primary endpoint. In addition, no statistically significant differences were observed in overall safety and efficacy variables between the two arms. Adventrx plans to fully analyze the data in order to determine the future course of development of CoFactor for this indication.

Cell Therapeutics announced positive results from a phase I trial of brostallicin for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. This multicenter, dose-escalation trial enrolled 21 subjects who received brostallicin, escalated from 5 to 7 to 9 mg/m2 in combination with a fixed dose of cisplatin (75 mg/m2). Treatment cycles were three weeks. The primary objective was to determine any dose limiting toxicities (DLT) during the first cycle and to define the optimal dose for future studies. No DLTs occurred at the 5 or 7 mg/m2 dose, while two subjects experienced DLTs at the 9 mg/m2 dose. Hence, the optimal dose for upcoming phase II trials was determined to be brostallicin 7 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 every three weeks. In addition, of the 21 treated subjects, 14 experienced disease stabilization with 7 subjects experiencing disease stabilization for more than 18 weeks. Based on the results, phase II trials are expected to commence shortly.

August 20, 2007

Cytopia reported positive preliminary results from a phase I trial of CYT997 for the treatment of cancer. This safety and efficacy trial enrolled subjects with a variety of solid tumors who had failed previous therapy or for whom no other therapy exists. The subjects received CYT997 administered as a 24-hour intravenous infusion on a three-weekly cycle, for a maximum of six cycles The primary endpoints, determination of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities, were both achieved. The MTD was established at 358 mg/m2 and two reversible dose limiting toxicities were observed; a prolongation of the QTc interval and hypoxia/dyspnoea. Based on the results, Cytopia is planning to initiate phase II trials by the end of 2007.

pSivida released positive preliminary results from a phase IIa trial of BrachySil for the treatment of inoperable pancreatic cancer. This trial enrolled 17 subjects in the United Kingdom and Singapore. Subjects received BrachySil directly to a tumor in the pancreas via endoscopic ultrasound, in combination with standard chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was safety. Secondary endpoints included efficacy (reduction of tumor size) and overall survival. Eight weeks follow-up data shows treatment was well tolerated, with no reports of drug related adverse events. Efficacy data from the first 10 treated subjects shows 90% of these subjects have had either stabilization or reduction in the size of their primary tumor. Full results are expected by the end of 2007.

June 4, 2007

Alchemia released positive final results from a phase II trial of HyCAMP for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This randomized trial enrolled 80 subjects with metastatic colorectal cancer who had previously failed therapy with 5 FU. Subjects received up to eight cycles of irinotecan (Camptosar) or HyCAMP intravenously. The results concluded that when compared to the irinotecan arm, the subjects receiving HyCAMP: showed a significantly greater increase in tumor response, showed a statistically significant increase in 'time to treatment failure', had a significantly longer period (+116%) of 'progression-free survival', were able to receive therapy for a median of three times longer than those receiving Camptosar, showed a trend towards longer overall survival and received less doses of anti-diarrheal medication. Based on the results, Alchemia plans to meet with the FDA and EMEA to determine the best future course of action towards gaining approval.

Peregrine announced positive results from a phase Ib trial of bavituximab for the treatment of cancer. This open-label trial enrolled 12 subjects in India who received bavituximab given with standard chemotherapy (including docetaxel, gemcitabine and carboplatin/paclitaxel) over an eight week period. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability as well as preliminary efficacy. Treatment was generally well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to that seen in advanced cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy alone. Objective tumor response or stable disease occurred in 50% of the subjects evaluable for tumor response. This response was greater In the subjects receiving bavituximab in combination with gemcitabine, with 75% of the subjects showing objective tumor response or stable disease. Based on the results, Peregrine plans to initiate further efficacy trials later in 2007.

February 19, 2007

Bayer and Onyx announced positive results from a phase III trial of Nexavar for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, dubbed SHARP (Sorafenib HCC Assessment Randomized Protocol), enrolled 602 subjects with primary liver cancer who had not undergone prior systemic therapy. Subjects received 400 mg of oral Nexavar twice daily or matching placebo. Treatment was well tolerated with no difference in adverse events between the two treatment arms. The trial's primary endpoint was met, with the Nexavar arm resulting in superior overall survival when compared to the placebo arm. Based on these results, Bayer and Onyx stopped the trial to allow all of the subject's access to Nexavar. They plan to move forward with filing for FDA approval.

Favrille reported positive long-term results from a phase II trial of Favld for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). This trial enrolled 15 subjects who received Favld after high dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. The first of five monthly injections of Favld was administered three months following transplantation. The trial was designed to evaluate the ability of treatment to induce humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, and to induce or maintain complete remission. Treatment was well tolerated. Data revealed that the majority of the subjects developed a rapid and tumor-specific immune response. In addition, at 61 months post-transplant, nine of the subjects remained in complete transmission. Favld is currently undergoing a second phase III trial with results expected by the end of 2007.

November 20, 2006

Kosan announced positive results from two ongoing phase I trials of KOS-1584 for the treatment of solid tumors. The first trial enrolled 37 subjects who received KOS-1584 via one-hour weekly intravenous infusion, in doses escalating from 0.8 to 25 mg/m2, every three out of four weeks. Treatment was generally well tolerated with low grade toxicities reported. Pharmacokinetic data revealed a half-life of 20-25 hours and a large volume of distribution. Antitumor activity was observed in 17% of the subjects, with one confirmed partial response and four subjects who reached stable disease over four or more cycles of treatment. The second trial enrolled 45 subjects who received KOS-1584 administered as a three-hour intravenous infusion, in doses escalating from 0.8 to 36 mg/m2, every three weeks. Treatment was well tolerated with the most common toxicities mild in nature. Antitumor activity was observed in 29.5% of the subjects, with 12 subjects reaching stable disease after 4 or more cycles of treatment. Both of these trials are ongoing in order to determine the best dose for phase II trials.

November 13, 2006

Amgen issued positive results from a phase II trial of AMG706 for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This trial enrolled 138 subjects who received at least one oral dose of AMG 706 at 125 mg per day until disease progression or toxicity. The primary endpoint of the trial was objective response per RECIST criteria. Secondary endpoints included an assessment of AMG706 on duration of response, progression-free survival, time to progression, survival and adverse events. The RECIST assessment showed a clinical benefit rate of 27% (3% partial response plus 24% durable stable disease greater than or equal to 22 weeks). The median progression-free survival was 16 weeks, with 26 week progression-free survival of 27%. Median survival was 59 weeks. Treatment was generally well tolerated with the most commonly reported adverse events including diarrhea, hypertension, fatigue and headache. Based on these results Amgen plans to move forward with the development of AMG706.

August 7, 2006

AEterna Zentaris and Spectrum Pharmaceuticals reported positive results of a phase II trial of ozarelix (D-63153), their luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonist for the treatment of hormone dependent prostate cancer. Trial data met their primary efficacy endpoint, establishing that cycles of 130 mg of the drug suppressed testosterone to castration-equivalent levels (< 0.5 ng/ml) for three months. In patients with castration-level suppression, serum PSA was reduced by at least 50% in 97% of subjects, compared to baseline. This open-label, randomized-controlled study enrolled 64 patients, who received one of three doses of the drug (65 mg, 100 mg 0r 130 mg) via intramuscular injection on varying 28-day dosing schedules for 3 treatment cycles. Additional results from the study were to be presented at the upcoming SIU (Societe Internationale D'Urologie) meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, on November 12, 2006.

Aida Pharmaceuticals has issued positive results of a phase I trial of Rh-Apo2L, their investigational gene therapy product for the treatment of malignant tumors. Preliminary efficacy data indicated that the drug reduced tumor size in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sarcoma and adrenal gland cortical tumors, and affected tumor size in non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer and parotid gland capsule adenocarcinoma. Treatment was generally well tolerated with no evidence of hematological toxicity observed. The study enrolled 20 patients at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Oncology Hospital in Beijing, China. Based on these results, the company announced plans to apply for clearance from the SFDA to initiate phase II and III trials in the near future, with projected completion of all studies before the end of 2007.

June 12, 2006

Ariad Pharmaceuticals announced positive results of a phase II trial of AP23573, for the treatment of soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. Trial data indicated significant improvements in the trial's co-primary endpoints, clinical benefit rate (CBR; combined rate of complete response, partial response and stable disease) and duration of progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with the three most common subclasses of sarcoma. Specifically, CBR was 30% for patients with bone sarcoma; 33% for leiomyosarcoma, and 30% for liposarcomas, compared to a historical baseline of 8%; rate of PFS through 6 months (24%) and median duration of PFS (15 weeks) did not significantly differ between the 3 groups, and was superior to a historical baseline of 7 weeks. Patients with less common "other" sarcomas experienced a 6-month PFS rate comparable to the other sub-groups, though CBR was lower (23%), and below the pre-determined 25% success threshold. This multi-center study enrolled 212 patients with metastatic and/or unresectable disease, who received fixed doses of 12.5 mg AP23573 monotherapy via intravenous infusion in 4-week cycles of 5 days on/9 days off treatment.

Exelixis reported positive results of a phase I trial of XL647, for the treatment of solid tumors. Trial data yielded preliminary evidence of efficacy, with 1 partial response (NSCLC) and 12 cases of stable disease through at least 3.5 months (3 NSCLC, 2 chordoma, 2 adenoid cystic carcinoma, and 1 each adrenocortical carcinoma, colorectal, ovarian, mesothelioma, and head & neck cancer). Maximum tolerated dose was set at 4.68 mg/kg; 2 subjects administered doses higher than this level experienced dose-limiting grade 3 diarrhea. This dose-escalation study enrolled 40 subjects, who were received multiple oral doses of the drug (0.06 mg/kg to 7.0 mg/kg).

GlaxoSmithKline reported positive results of a phase III trial, dubbed EGF100151, of Tykerb, for the treatment of breast cancer. Trial data yielded significant efficacy, significantly extending time to disease progression compared to control therapy (36.9 weeks vs. 19.7 weeks; p=0.00032). Rates of treatment-related adverse events leading to discontinuation were comparable between the Tykerb (14%) and control (11%) regimens. This international, multicenter, open-label study enrolled 392 women with trastuzumab-refractory ErbB2 positive breast cancer, who received either a combination regimen of Tykerb and the approved drug capecitabine, or capecitabine alone. These results were sufficiently positive for the trial's DSMB to recommend early termination of the study in April 2006, so all patients could be transferred to the combination regimen.

ImClone announced positive results of a phase I trial of IMC-1121B, for the treatment of advanced cancers. Maximum tolerated dose had yet to be reached, with anorexia, vomiting, anemia, depression, fatigue and insomnia noted as the most frequent adverse events. These adverse events were noted as potentially distinct from those observed with other compounds designed to disrupt the VEGF system. Preliminary evidence of efficacy was also noted, with 1 partial tumor response and 5 instances of stable disease. This open-label study had enrolled 14 subjects to date, and dose-escalation was ongoing.

Pharmion and MethylGene reported interim results of a pair of phase I trials of MGCD0103, for the treatment of hematological malignancies (leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)), and solid tumors. Both trials were open-label, dose-escalation monotherapy studies, which had enrolled 23 and 28 patients to date, respectively. In the leukemia/MDS study, the maximum tolerated dose was somewhat below 80 mg/m2 thrice weekly, at which dose nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and/or fatigue were dose-limiting. 3 patients (2 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with MDS) achieved complete bone-marrow response. In the solid tumor trial, maximum tolerated dose had not yet been reached; the most common adverse event to date was Grade 1-3 fatigue. Stable disease was observed in 5 subjects (3 kidney cancer, 1 NSCLC and 1 colon cancer). Based on these results, the company announced plans to initiate a phase I/II trial of the drug in Q2 2006, with phase II trials to follow before year's end.

May 2, 2005

Point Therapeutics has announced results of a phase II trial of their investigational orally active irreversible dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor talabostat, for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results from the study indicated that the drug, in combination with the chemotherapeutic docetaxel, met the study's primary endpoints of improving overall tumor response vs. docetaxel alone. This single-arm, two-stage study enrolled patients with stage IIIb/IV NSCLC whose tumors were refractory to a platinum-based first-line chemotherapy regimen. The company announced plans to present expanded results of the study at the 41st Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in May, and to initiate phase III trials of the drug later in 2005.

April 25, 2005

Adventrx Pharmaceuticals reported results of a phase II trial of CoFactor (CH2FH4), in combination with 5- fluorouracil (5-FU), for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Toxicity and pharmacodynamic data indicated a positive toxicity profile based on a laboratory measures. Specifically, administration of CoFactor produced an increase producing increases in RBC folate pool expansion (form a mean baseline score of 533 ng/ml to a score of 1295 ng/ml following weekly dosing), urinary folate excretion (an indication of formaldehyde toxicity) showed a small decrease (from a baseline historical baseline of 5 ug/ml to a post-treatment mean of 3.7 ug/ml). These data support the use of CoFactor in combination with 5-FU to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity. This open-label study enrolled subjects with metastatic colorectal cancer, and was designed to investigate several laboratory measures of the toxicity associated with CoFactor administration and metabolism, in the hopes that the drug in combination with 5-FU will provide better efficacy and reduced toxicity, compared to standard therapy of 5-FU and leucovorin. The company announced that these data would serve to support upcoming phase IIb and III trials in the UK and the US.

Agennix reported positive results of a phase II trial of talactoferrin alpha in combination with chemotherapy, for the first line treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results from the study found that the addition of talactoferrin significantly improved overall response rate vs. placebo. Specifically, overall response rate in the prospectively defined evaluable patient group was 47%, vs. 29% for placebo (p= 0.05). The addition of talactoferrin was also well tolerated, with no evidence of increased toxicity. This double-blind, placebo- controlled study enrolled 110 treatment-naïve NSCLC patients, who were randomized 1:1 to receive talactoferrin or placebo, in combination with a standard chemotherapeutic regimen of carboplatin/paclitaxel.

Human Genome Sciences reported positive results of an ongoing phase I trial of their investigational TRAIL-1 monoclonal antibody HGS-ETR1, for the treatment of solid tumors. Trial data met their safety endpoints, with the highest dose acceptably tolerated and a generally mild (Grade 1 or 2) adverse event profile. Pharmacokinetics were proportional to dose, and mean elimination half-life was 17 days. Efficacy was also noted, with 10 instances of stable disease, including one subject who had received 16 treatments with the drug. This open-label, multi-center, dose- escalation trial had enrolled 44 heavily pretreated subjects to date (median prior chemotherapeutic regimens: 6), who received one of 7 IV doses of the drug (0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, or 10.0 mg/kg), once every 14 or 28 days.

Medarex and Bristol-Myers Squibb reported positive results of a phase II study of their investigational two-drug therapy for metastatic melanoma, which includes the anti-CTLA-4 antibody MDX-010 and the gp100 melanoma vaccine MDX-1379. Both trial dosing regimens yielded evidence of efficacy, with 2 complete responses (ongoing through 30 and 31 months) and 2 partial responses (4 months; ongoing through 34 months) in cohort 1, and 3 partial responses (6 months; ongoing through 25 and 26 months) in cohort 2. Serious Grade III/IV adverse events occurred more often in cohort 1 (n=9) than cohort 2 (n=5). This two- armed open-label study enrolled 56 subjects with metastatic melanoma, who received MDX-1379 plus 3.0 mg/kg MDX-010 every 3 weeks (cohort 1; n=29), or MDX-1379 plus an initial 3.0 mg/kg dose of MDX-010, followed by 1.0 mg/kg every 3 weeks (cohort 2; n=27).

April 18, 2005

Celgene reported positive interim results of a pair of parallel phase III trials of Revlimid (lenalidomide), for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Trial data have yielded strong evidence of superiority, with a median time to progression of at least 15 months for the US study and more than 11 months for the international study, vs. only 5 months for subjects receiving dexamethasone alone. This superiority was highly statistically significant (p<0.00001), and the duration and number of ongoing responses mean that the primary endpoint, which was to characterize the overall time to progression, cannot yet be calculated. Clinical responses were observed in 51.3% and 47.5% (respectively by trial) of subjects receiving combination therapy with the drug, vs. 22.9% and 18.4% of subjects receiving dexamethasone monotherapy (p=0.001). Both studies were randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials which enrolled relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients; these patients were randomized 1:1 to receive Revlimid plus dexamethasone (combination therapy) or dexamethasone alone. One trial enrolled 354 subjects across 47 US sites, while the other enrolled 351 subjects across 50 international sites. These ongoing trials are being conducted under a Special Protocol Assessment with the FDA, and will form the basis of both NDA and MAA submissions.

CureTech issued results of a phase I trial of their investigational monoclonal antibody CT-011, for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Trial data yielded positive safety indications, with no significant adverse events noted and a positive overall toxicity profile: no dose-limiting toxicities were observed, the most common adverse events were mild allergic reaction and low grade fever, and single-administration maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Preliminary evidence of clinical response was also observed in 5 subjects, with 1 partial response (including platelet transfusion independence) through 8 months, 2 incidences of stable disease through at least 7 months, and 2 minimal responses. This open-label escalating dose study enrolled 17 subjects with advanced refractory hematological malignancies at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center in Tel-Hashomer, Israel. Subjects received a single 5-hour intravenous infusion of escalating doses of the drug, and were followed for safety, tolerability, and evidence of disease progression.

Lorus Therapeutics has reported preliminary results of a phase II study of GTI-2040, their investigational ribonucleotide reductase R2 inhibitor, for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Results from the study yielded evidence of efficacy, with 52% of subjects experiencing disease stabilization or better, including 1 patient with a 23% reduction in tumor burden and disease stabilization through 10 months and 1 partial response, a 39% reduction in tumor burden and disease stabilization through 8 months. This open-label study enrolled 33 patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma across 7 US sites, who received combination therapy with GTI-2040 and capecitabine, an approved chemotherapeutic. The trial was co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.

April 4, 2005

Viventia Biotech reported positive preliminary results from a phase I investigating Proxinium, a monoclonal antibody conjugated to a cytotoxic protein payload for the monotherapy treatment of refractory head and neck cancer. Efficacy results showed that 25% of the 16 patients who expressed the therapeutic target for Proxinium had a complete response to therapy, which was defined as a complete disappearance of the tumor. Data showed that 63% of subjects had an objective response, defined as significant or partial shrinkage of the tumor; and 88% had tumor growth control, defined as an objective response or stabilization of disease. The drug was shown to have a good safety profile and was well tolerated. The study enrolled 20 subjects who had failed previous courses of surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The patients received the drug by direct intratumoral injection directly into a target tumor on a weekly basis for four weeks. The study was conducted in Brazil. The company plans to report full results at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in May 2005.<

March 22, 2004

AVI BioPharma reported positive results from a clinical trial investigating AVI-4557, an oral Neugene antisense drug. Results showed that administration of AVI-4557 lowered midazolam levels by 700 ml/min from a baseline of 877 ml/min. Maximal blood concentration (Cmax) increased from 51 ng/ml pre-dose to 81 ng/ml post-dose. The study was designed to investigate AVI-4557 ability to inhibit expression of CYP and alter the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, an anesthetic drug metabolized by CYP. The study evaluated a 10mg midazolam dose, followed by five daily oral doses of AVI-4557. The primary endpoint was a reduced rate of midazolam metabolism as demonstrated by a decrease in midazolam clearance and an increase in midazolam (Cmax).

October 27, 2003

Astrazeneca reported final results from a pivotal phase II trial investigating Iressa (gefitinib), an approved drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Results showed that 12% of subjects who received Iressa (250 mg),once daily, demonstrated at least a 50% reduction in tumor size. Further analysis showed a tumor response rate of 13.6% at the recommended dose of 250 mg and 10.6% overall for both doses tested. The median duration of response was 7 months. The double-blind, randomized study enrolled 216 subjects who had previously received two or more types of chemotherapy. Iressa is approved in the U.S. for use as monotherapy for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer after failure of both platinum-based and docetaxel chemotherapy. Results were reported in October 2003 in The Journal of the American Medical Association.

GlycoGenesys reported positive results from a phase I trial investigating GSC-100, a Galectin-3 targeting agent for the treatment of various cancers. Results showed that five (41.7%) subjects achieved stable disease for at least three months. One subject still remains on GCS-100 after 18 months of treatment and has achieved a partial response. GCS-100 was well tolerated with no dose-limiting toxicity observed. A maximally tolerated dose was not reached at dose levels up to 80 mg/m2. The open-label, dose escalation study enrolled 12 subjects and was designed to test the drug on subjects with unresectable, relapsed, or refractory advanced solid tumors for which there is no curative therapy. GCS-100 was administered intravenously, twice weekly, at doses of 30, 42.5, 60 or 80 mg/m2 for up to six, four-week treatment cycles, or six months.

June 9, 2003

Agennix and Veterans Affairs Medical Center reported positive results from two phase I/II trials investigating Lactoferrin (rhLF), a natural protein found in milk, for the treatment of solid tumors. Data showed that 53% of evaluable subjects (10 /19) demonstrated stable disease, three of which showed tumor shrinkage. In addition, 29 subjects completed dosing, with only one withdraw due to disease progression. The saftey portion of the studies enrolled 30 subjects and evaluated rhLF as a single agent for the treatment of solid non-resectable tumor cancer patients, who had progressed on standard chemotherapy. Subjects were administered one of four different doses of rhLF, (1.5g to 9g), either for 14 days or in cycles of 14 days. The drug was well tolerated with no drug-related serious adverse events reported.

February 10, 2003

Aphton reported positive interim results from a phase II trial investigating G17DT, an anti-gastrin immunogen for the treatment of gastric cancers. Interim results showed an overall response rate of 51%, with 37 subjects achieving a partial or complete tumor response. An additional 23 subjects achieved stable disease. One subject responded to the treatment with a 70% reduction in tumor size and disease stabilization 7 to 8 months after therapy. After the sixth treatment the subject achieved a complete response. The randomized study enrolled 103 subjects (73 evaluable) with metastatic stomach cancer who were treated with G17DT plus chemotherapy and 5FU.

Exelixis reported positive preliminary results from a phase II trial investigating DEAE-Rebeccamycin, an anticancer compound for the treatment of bile duct tumors. Data revealed that the drug was safe and may result in tumor shrinkage. Early results included two partial responses and 7 disease stabilizations, a 45% non-progression rate. Adverse events included transient and reversible myelosuppression. Nine subjects had survived upon a 12.5-month median follow-up. The results were compiled from a cohort of 20 subjects with advanced unresectable bile duct cancers. Subjects were given a 165 mg dose of rebeccamycin analogue daily for five days every three weeks. Exelixis and the NCI are collaborating on the development of rebeccamycin.

February 3, 2003

Amgen reported positive results from a phase III trial investigating rHu-KGF, a natural keratinocyte growth factor for the treatment of oral mucositis as a complication of cancer treatments. Preliminary results from the randomized, double blind trial were positive on all endpoints showing a highly significant decrease in both the duration and incidence of severe mucositis. In addition, results showed that the drug was well tolerated. The study enrolled subjects who underwent bone marrow transplantation treatment for hematologic malignancies such as lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and leukemia.

January 21, 2003

ImmunoGen reported results of a phase I dose-escalation study of HuC242-DM1/SB-408075 (cantuzumab mertansine) in subjects with refractory cancer that expresses the CanAg antigen. Dosing was increased in each new cohort of subjects until dose-limiting toxicity was demonstrated. Based on the results, the recommended dose for cantuzumab mertansine is 235 mg/m2 when administered once every three weeks. In addition, one subject with colon cancer exhibited DM1 localization at the tumor site 24 hours after administration of the drug. Furthermore, this subject had a reduction in lung metastases after two and four courses of cantuzumab mertansine

Introgen reported positive results from a phase II trial investigating Advexin (p53 therapy) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Results showed that approximately 60% of subjects' primary tumors regressed or disappeared, as assessed by both biopsies and by CT scans three months after treatment. Administration of the drug did not appear to increase the side effect caused by radiation treatment. The study enrolled subjects with non-metastatic non-small cell lung cancer who were ineligible to receive alternative treatments. Advexin was administered via injection into tumors at a range of doses over one month.

Rational Therapeutics reported positive results from two phase II trials investigating gemcitabine with cisplatin as a combination therapy in the treatment of relapsed ovarian cancer. In the first study, results showed that the combination therapy achieved a 70% response rate, with more than 20% of subjects achieving complete remission. Subjects who demonstrated the most tumor response also showed the most sensitivity to the drug in ex-vivo laboratory assays. Out of 27 subjects, there were 26% (7) complete and 44% (12) partial responses. Subjects received cisplatin (30 mg/m2) plus gemcitabine (600-750 mg/m2) intravenously. Seventeen subjects underwent ex vivo analyses for correlation with clinical response. The second study enrolled 36 platinum and paclitaxel resistant subjects. Of the 15 subjects that responded, 11 were partial clinical responses and 4 were complete clinical responses. Gemcitabine (750 mg/m2) was administered intravenously over 30 min followed by cisplatin (30 mg/m2).

January 6, 2003

Isis Pharmaceuticals reported positive results from a phase II trial investigating ISIS 2503 in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Results showed 57.5% of subjects who received ISIS 2503, in combination with gemcitabine, survived six months or longer with a median survival time for those 20 subjects of 6.7 months. This was compared to historical gemcitabine pivotal trial results of 46% at six months survival with a median survival time of 5.6 months. The open-label Phase II trial enrolled 48 subjects with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer who had not received prior chemotherapy for their disease.

Neurocrine Biosciences reported positive results from two trials investigating IL-4 Fusion Toxin (NBI-3001) for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and solid tumors. Preliminary data from an ongoing phase I trial conducted in subjects with peripheral solid tumors showed the study has met the primary objectives of defining dose toxicity and tolerance. Two subjects with kidney carcinoma showed stable disease at the maximum tolerated dose. Data from a phase II trial conducted on subjects with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) showed a median survival greater than six months at low dosage (90 mcg) with the majority of the subjects still alive at time of follow up. MRI scans showed 25% of the subjects reached stable or partial regression of disease. The open label study enrolled 32 subjects with recurrent GBM and infused them intramorally at high, medium and low doses over five days.

December 16, 2002

SuperGen reported positive results from more than 12 trials investigating Nipent for the treatment of multiple cancers. A phase II trial using Nipent in combination with Rituximab for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) demonstrated that 33% of subjects achieved an objective response. Stable disease was observed in 54% of subjects with a median response of 9.8 months. A phase I trial using Nipent for the treatment of steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease enrolled 23 subjects with a variety of hematological malignancies. Results showed 11 subjects achieved complete responses and 6 achieved partial or mixed responses. A long term follow-up study of Nipent in 180 subjects with hairy cell leukemia demonstrated a response rate of 98%. Data showed that 83% of subjects achieved a complete response and 15% achieved a partial response.

Titan Pharmaceuticals reported mixed results from a phase III trial investigating CeaVac, a monoclonal antibody for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. CeaVac failed to demonstrate a statistically significant improvement in the primary endpoint of survival in the overall efficacy, but a trend toward 2-3 month survival improvement was shown in subjects receiving at least 5 doses. The randomized, placebo-controlled study enrolled 631 subjects receiving chemotherapy with 5- flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin for metastatic colorectal cancer. Subjects in the study received injections of CeaVac once every two weeks for 2 months and then once per month after. Treatment with CeaVac was generally well tolerated, with the most common side effect being local injection site irritation.

December 2, 2002

Cell Therapeutics reported positive results from a series of clinical trials investigating Trisenox (arsenic trioxide) and concluded that the drug may be effective in inducing high rates of remission in hematologic malignancies like myelodysplasia (MDS) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the study, 29 subjects with newly diagnosed CML, 19 subjects (66 %) achieved complete remission with four subjects achieving partial remission for an overall response rate of 79 %. In 21 subjects with MDS-refractory anemia (MDS-RA), six subjects (29 %) achieved a complete remission and eight subjects (38 %) achieved a partial remission for an overall objective response rate of 67 %. In 18 subjects with MDS-refractory anemia with excess blasts (MDS-RAEB), three achieved stable disease or better.

Kosan Biosciences and Roche reported positive interim results from a phase I trial investigating KOS-862 (Epothilone D), a polyketide natural product similar to paclitaxel for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. The study is determining possible drug-related toxicities, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of escalating intravenous doses of KOS-862 administered every 3 weeks. Pharmacokinetics are linear and the drug shows a 10-hour half-life with good tissue penetration. The pharmacodynamic measurements demonstrate that maximal microtubule bundle formation in peripheral blood cells correlates with maximal plasma concentrations. To date, KOS-862 has been evaluated in 42 subjects with results showing no myelosuppression.

November 25, 2002

GenVec reported positive results from a phase Ib trial investigating TNFerade for the treatment of cancer. The study was designed to test the safety and efficacy of TNFerade in 63 subjects with a wide variety of cancers. The data showed 73% of subjects showed objective tumor shrinkage, their tumors shrank between 25% and 100%, with TNFerade therapy. The objective tumor responses were shown to be: Complete Response (CR) 16.6% of subjects, Partial Response (PR) 30% of subjects and Minor Response (MR) 26% of subjects. Among the subjects with pancreatic cancer, 75% showed tumor shrinkage and one subject showed no disease progression after 18 months. TNFerade was well tolerated and side effects were all classified as mild.

Maxim Pharmaceuticals reported positive results from a phase II trial investigating Ceplene (histamine dihydrochloride) with interleukin-2 (Il-2) for the treatment of advanced metastatic melanoma. The treatment significantly increased the expression of CD3 zeta in T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells. Treatment with Ceplene and IL-2 also resulted in a decrease in the production of IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine associated with the down-regulation of T cells and NK cells. The study, which enrolled a total of 50 subjects, was designed to investigate the effect of Ceplene and IL-2 on the expression of specific cellular markers that may be associated with the function of key immune cells.

November 4, 2002

PRIMABioMed reported positive preliminary results of a phase I trial investigating their dendritic cell based therapy as a cancer treatment. The therapy recognizes a cancer protein that is highly expressed in breast, ovarian, lung and prostate cancers and so is able to stimulate a specific immune response. The study consisted of 10 subjects with various cancers, treated with three doses of therapy, over a 12-week period. Data demonstrated the therapy was safe and was able to produce the specific immunological response. The study was conducted at the Austin Research Institute (ARI) and the Austin & Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne, Australia.

October 21, 2002

Novartis reported positive results from a study to examine the long-term efficacy of Zometa. Novartis submitted the data along with its sNDA for the indication of bone metastases developed from advanced cancers. The data was analyzed from three large multi-center, randomized pivotal trials of more than 3,000 patients The trials demonstrate that the benefits of Zometa were maintained over the approximately two years of treatment follow-up. In addition, breast cancer patients treated with Zometa 4 mg had a significantly lower risk of developing skeletal complications after two years of treatment, compared with those treated with pamidronate 90 mg.

April 8, 2002

Phase I trial results for Oncolytics Biotech's Reolysin, a potential cancer therapeutic for Ras activated tumors, indicate that the drug is generally well tolerated. The trial evaluated escalating dosages of Reolysin administered directly into a subcutaneous tumor in 18 terminal cancer subjects with progressive cancer that had failed to respond to conventional therapies. None of the subjects receiving Reolysin experienced any serious adverse events related to the virus, and no dose-limiting toxicities were detected. Evidence of viral activity, which was defined as transitory or lasting tumor regression of at least 30%, was detected in 11 of 18 patients (61%), with regression ranging from 32% to 100%.