Last updated on October 2017

Pilot Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Abatacept in Adults and Children 6 Years and Older With Excessive Loss of Protein in the Urine Due to Either Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or Minimal Change Disease (MCD)


Brief description of study

The purpose of this study is evaluate if abatacept is effective and safe in decreasing the level of protein loss in the urine in patients with excessive loss of protein in the urine (nephrotic syndrome) due to either focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or minimal change disease (MCD). Candidates must have a prior kidney biopsy with either diagnosis. Another kidney biopsy will not be required as part of the study. Candidates must have failed or be intolerant of prior therapy for their kidney disease. The failed or intolerant therapy must include corticosteroids and at least one other drug. Candidates can be adults and children over the age of 6. Abatacept will be administered by venous infusion every 4 weeks.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT02592798

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Site 0028

Local Institution
Birmingham, AL United States
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Daniel Feig, Site 0001

The University Of Alabama At Birmingham
Birmingham, AL United States
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Site 0024

Local Institution
Palo Alto, CA United States
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Sharon Adler, Site 0009

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute
Torrance, CA United States
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Joshua Thurman, Site 0016

University Of Colorado Denver
Aurora, CO United States
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Asha Moudgil, Site 0017

Children's National Health System
Washington, D.C., United States
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Jayanthi Chandar, Site 0015

University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine
Miami, FL United States
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Site 0026

Local Institution
Orlando, FL United States
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Larry Greenbaum, Site 0004

Emory University
Atlanta, GA United States
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Rekha Agrawal, Site 0011

Loyola University Medical Center
Maywood, IL United States
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Jeffrey Kopp, Site 0005

NIH Clinical Center - NIDDK
Bethesda, MD United States
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Michael Somers, Site 0007

Boston Childrens Hospital
Boston, MA United States
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Anna Greka, Site 0002

Brigham And Women'S Hosp Inc.
Boston, MA United States
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Debbie Gipson, Site 0003

University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI United States
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Ladan Zand, Site 0010

Mayo Clinic
Rochester, MN United States
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Tarak Srivastava, Site 0025

Childrens Mercy Hospital
Kansas City, MO United States
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Howard Trachtman, Site 0013

New York University Langone Medical Center
New York, NY United States
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Gerald Appel, Site 0014

Columbia University Medical Center (Cumc)
New York, NY United States
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Susan Massengill, Site 0021

Levine Children'S Hospital
Charlotte, NC United States
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Rasheed Gbadegesin, Site 0012

Duke University
Durham, NC United States
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Stuart Goldstein, Site 0020

Cincinnati Children'S Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati, OH United States
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Jeffrey Schelling, Site 0006

The Metro Health System
Cleveland, OH United States
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Isabelle Ayoub, Site 0029

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Columbus, OH United States
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Jonathan Hogan, Site 0008

University Of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA United States
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Site 0027

Local Institution
Pittsburgh, PA United States
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Bernard Fischbach, Site 0022

Renal Disease Research Institute
Dallas, TX United States
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Elizabeth Brown, Site 0023

University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Dallas, TX United States
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