Last updated on November 2018

Surgical Tissue Flap to Bypass the Blood Brain Barrier in GBM


Brief description of study

This study assesses the safety of using tissue autograft of a pedicled temporoparietal fascial (TPF) or pericranial flap into the resection cavity of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients.

The objective of the study is to demonstrate that this surgical technique is safe in a small human cohort of patients with resected newly diagnosed GBM and may improve progression-free survival (PFS).

Detailed Study Description

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary central nervous system malignancy in adults, and accounts for over half of all malignant brain tumors. The prognosis for newly diagnosed GBM is extremely poor even with Stupp protocol consisting of surgery followed by temozolomide and radiotherapy. Present therapies are inadequate, as evidenced by the low 5-year survival rate for brain cancer patients, with median survival at approximately 12 months and treatment for GBM remains a significant unmet clinical need in oncology.

All subjects included in the study will initially undergo standard surgical resection for newly diagnosed GBM. Following the resection, the surgical cavity will be lined with a long pedicled, autologous piece of tissue called a temporoparietal fascial flap or pericranium. The patient's dura, bone and scalp will be closed as is customary. The permeability of the blood vessels of the TPF or pericranial flap should allow for improved delivery of therapeutics and immune cells (macrophages and T cells) into the vicinity, extracellular space and microenvironment of the resected tumor cavity including the brain adjacent to the GBM. The TPF or pericranial flap would easily conform to many resected GBM cavities in our human patients with acceptable risk. The TPF and pericranial flap with its predictable and rich vascular anatomy have been shown to be an ideal flap for cases of previously irradiated and/or infected wound beds.

The investigators hypothesize that a TPF or pericranial flap that is harvested in our patients with resected GBM may be used as a readily available and accessible means of circumventing the blood brain barrier selectively and focally. The investigators aim to prove that this surgical technique is safe in a small human cohort of patients with resected newly diagnosed GBM and may improve progression-free survival (PFS).

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03630289

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John Boockvar, MD

Lenox Hill Brain Tumor Center
New York, NY United States
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