Last updated on April 2018

Compression Therapy for Leg Ulcers and Kaposi Sarcoma in Western Kenya


Brief description of study

The efficacy of locally sourced compression therapy in the management of chronic leg ulcers and Kaposi Sarcoma in western Kenya will be studied in a rural setting

Detailed Study Description

Compression therapy is a well-established cornerstone therapy and part of routine clinical care for chronic leg ulcers from venous disease and lymphedema, including Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated lymphedema. Chronic leg ulcers, from trauma or chronic venous disease, and lymphedema have a significant impact on quality of life, driven by pain, foul odor, and restricted mobility. The provision of compression therapy in resource-limited settings, as in western Kenya and other regions of East Africa, is a major challenge. In western Kenya, locally available elastic stockings are priced at 10-15 USD (1000-1500 kshs) per pair. Pre-packaged brand name kits are not locally available or affordable for patients, as imported kits costs 7-20 USD (700-2000 kshs) per package. However, materials used routinely in wound care, namely elastic crepe, gauze, and zinc oxide, are readily available and affordable for patients. Supplies required to dress one affected leg for a week cost 2 USD (200 kshs). The use of locally-sourced routine wound care supplies for compression therapy is poised to have significant impact on reducing morbidity, social stigma, and economic loss associated with chronic leg ulcers and Kaposi sarcoma-associated lymphedema. Demonstration of its feasibility and efficacy in treating chronic leg ulcers and Kaposi sarcoma-associated lymphedema in western Kenya could have far-reaching implications for the treatment of these prevalent conditions across East Africa and sub-Saharan Africa. This project will utilize a

  1. retrospective study design to evaluate the efficacy of compression therapy for the treatment of chronic leg ulcer patients seen at Turbo Health Center, one of the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) sites and 2) randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of compression therapy in the management of Kaposi sarcoma leg lymphedema patients seen at AMPATH/MTRH oncology clinics. If the outcomes of this project support the use of locally-sourced compression therapy in the treatment of chronic leg ulcers and Kaposi sarcoma-associated lymphedema, future studies for chronic leg ulcers will focus on scaling up use of locally-sourced compression therapy at other AMPATH clinics and exploring feasibility of community-based care. Future studies for Kaposi sarcoma lymphedema will focus on exploring feasibility of community or home-based lymphedema care.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03404297

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

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Edith Chepngeno, BPharm

Chulaimbo District Hospital
Chulaimbo, Kenya
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Sonak Pastakia

Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital
Eldoret, Kenya
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