Last updated on February 2018

Adverse Drug Events at Emergency Department


Brief description of study

Emergency departments (EDs) are a crucial element of the health care systems at interface between hospital and communities. The goals of the ED are to make an initial diagnosis and deliver urgent and critical care 24 hour per day and 365 days a year. Also, many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are not identified by emergency physicians. ADEs are injuries resulting from a drug related medical intervention. Their detection, documentation and reporting are essential for adequate medical care and knowledge of risk/benefit profiles of medication throughout their lifecycle. However, a number of studies indicate that in clinical practice the under-reporting of ADEs is a pervasive and widespread problem. The main reasons for under-reporting were difficulty in determining the cause of the ADE, lack of time, poor integration of ADE-reporting systems and uncertainty about reporting procedures. Successful treatment of ADEs depends on the ability of physicians to attribute ADEs to a medication. Some studies have reported that pharmacists but also student pharmacists were one of the best health care providers to establish medication history. Consequently, the aims of our study were to assess prevalence and characteristics of ADEs identified in an emergency department and to identify factors associated with ADEs in ED patients.

This prospective observational study is conducted at the ED of a tertiary care hospital (University hospital of Montpellier). This department supports 80 000 patients every years. Patient were not included if they were less than 18 years old, present acute psychological disturbance or they did not agree to participate at this study.

For each patient included, a pharmaceutical team conducted: medication reconciliation process to establish medication history and a structured interviews to determine self-reported adherence and self-medication. ADEs were attributed to a medication by the treating senior emergency physician: directly during patient consultation or after being alerted by the pharmaceutical team.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03442010

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cyril BREUKER

Uhmontpellier
Montpellier, France
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