Last updated on February 2018

Effect of Dietary Modifacation on Microbiota in Overweight and Obese Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Patients


Brief description of study

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting women of reproductive age. The pathogenesis of PCOS is not fully understood. The intestinal microbiota are believed to be associated with the development of insulin resistance and obesity, and therefore contributing to the development of PCOS. Incresed permeability of the intestinal mucosal barier and absorbtion of lipoproteinase (LPS) from G (-) bacteria promotes chronic inflammation and may lead to insulin resistance.

Approximately 50-60% of women suffering from PCOS are obese. It is known that lifestyle modification and body mass reduction improves endocrine parameters and restores ovulatory menstrual cycles in most patients. Currently, the use of probiotics and prebiotics is playing an increasingly important role in the treatment of obesity through the modulation of intestinal microflora.

The objectives of the study are based on the following assumptions:

  1. Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are important aspects in the pathogenesis of PCOS and co-morbidity of cardiovascular disease.
  2. Aberrations in the intestinal microflora are associated with the development of obesity and insulin resistance.
  3. Dietary modification combined with probiotic supplementation improves endocrine and metabolic profiles in women with PCOS.

Detailed Study Description

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy affecting women of reproductive age. The pathogenesis of PCOS is not fully understood. The intestinal microbiota are believed to be associated with the development of insulin resistance and obesity, and therefore contributing to the development of PCOS. Incresed permeability of the intestinal mucosal barier and absorbtion of lipoproteinase (LPS) from G (-) bacteria promotes chronic inflammation and may lead to insulin resistance.

The microbiome consists of a complex community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract. Intestinal microflora is colonized by various microorganisms, with the largest groups consisting of the Firmicutes, Bacteroides, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Intestinal microflora has a beneficial effect on the host by competing with pathogenic bacteria, protecting the inegrity of the intestinal mucosal barier and stimulating the immune system. Some human gut microorganisms are involved In fermenting dietary fiber into short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetic acid and butyric acid, which are then absorbed by the host. The most beneficial species of microbiota are Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium.

Approximately 50-60% of women suffering from PCOS are obese. It is known that lifestyle modification and body mass reduction improves endocrine parameters and restores ovulatory menstrual cycles in most patients. Currently, the use of probiotics and prebiotics is playing an increasingly important role in the treatment of obesity through the modulation of intestinal microflora.

The objectives of the study are based on the following assumptions:

  1. Insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are important aspects in the pathogenesis of PCOS and co-morbidity of cardiovascular disease.
  2. Aberrations in the intestinal microflora are associated with the development of obesity and insulin resistance.
  3. Dietary modification combined with probiotic supplementation improves endocrine and metabolic profiles in women with PCOS.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03325023

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