Last updated on May 2018

The Development of Novel Clinical Tests to Diagnose and Monitor Asthma in Preschool Children


Brief description of study

The study will ascertain the ability of preschool lung function tests to distinguish healthy children from those with wheeze, and to differentiate phenotypes of wheezy children (high and low risk for asthma as defined by API) in order to predict response to therapy, and to explore the correlation between preschool lung function test results and symptoms, in order to develop objective methods for monitoring asthma.

Detailed Study Description

In Canada, the most common chronic disease of childhood is asthma. Childhood asthma places a significant burden on the health care system (refn). No objective preschool asthma diagnostic tools exist, and the current gold-standard, the Asthma Predictive Index, does not provide information about lung function and symptom management. In this study, it is hypothesized that the lung clearance index (LCI), a value derived from the multiple breath washout test, will be the most sensitive, responsive discriminative test for preschool asthma. If it proves useful in the monitoring and diagnosis of preschool asthma, LCI has the potential to improve the clinical management and thus potentially significantly reduce hospitalization rates for preschool children suffering with asthma. In this unique data set, the investigators will also compare the relative utility of the forced oscillation technique (FOT) and preschool spirometry with the LCI in order to detect abnormalities amongst those children at high risk for preschool asthma. In addition, the impact of sleep apnea as a risk factor for and modifier of asthma will be investigated in this study. Furthermore, changes to the composition of the nasal microbiome during and after a wheezing episodes and the role of viral infections in wheezing exacerbations will be explored. Finally, the utility of new methods of diagnosing food allergy, such as the basophil activation test, will be examined in this Canadian cohort.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT02743663

Contact Investigators or Research Sites near you

Start Over

Padmaja Subbarao, MD

The Hospital for Sick Children
Toronto, ON Canada
  Connect »