Last updated on February 2018

Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Emerging Adults in the ER

Brief description of study

This project will develop a technology-augmented HIV and substance use risk reduction intervention for delivery in the Emergency Department, a medical setting where at-risk emerging adults who use drugs and engage in HIV-related risk behaviors are likely to present.

Detailed Study Description

Research regarding substance use (including illicit drugs and non-medical use of prescription drugs) and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors (HIV SRBs; e.g., inconsistent condom use, multiple partners, sex while intoxicated; and prevention of injection drug use) among emerging adults (EAs; ages 18-25) has generally focused on alcohol use among college students from campus settings; however, substance use and HIV (and other associated Sexually Transmitted Infections) disproportionately occur among young people living in urban, low-resource communities, particularly individuals of racial minorities. The Emergency Department (ED) is a critical venue for accessing at-risk EAs engaging in substance use and HIV risk behaviors. Research shows high rates of substance use and HIV SRBs among EA patients in the ED, yet no intervention exists for EAs in this setting. The ED may be the only opportunity to intervene with these young people because EAs in urban, low-resource settings often lack a primary care provider during the transition from pediatric to adult medicine, may be un-insured or under-insured, and may not be involved in a traditional college campus setting. Further the use of technology (e.g., mobile phones) is relatively ubiquitous among this age group, and most prefer technology-based communication (e.g., text messaging or instant messaging via apps), therefore interventions for EAs may be enhanced by this type of technology. In this phase we will test a tailored intervention for EA patients in the ED focusing on reducing substance use and HIV SRBs, which will be enhanced through the use of mobile app notifications.

Clinical Study Identifier: NCT03079856

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Lisa Zbizek Nulph

Hurley Medical Center
Flint, MI United States
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